Unidentified Soldiers Of The 33rd United States Colored Troops

The 33rd was oganized January 31, 1863 or February 8, 1864, as 1st South Carolina Volunteers Colored Infantry. Attached to U. S. Forces, Port Royal Island, South Carolina, 10th Corps, Dept. of the South, to April, 1864. Mustered out January 31, 1866

"No officer in this regiment now doubts that the key to the successful prosecution of this war lies in the unlimited employment of black troops. Their superiority lies simply in the fact that they know the country, while white troops do not, and, moreover, that they have peculiarities of temperament, position, and motive which belong to them alone. Instead of leaving their homes and families to fight they are fighting for their homes and families, and they show the resolution and sagacity which a personal purpose gives. It would have been madness to attempt, with the bravest white troops what I have successfully accomplished with the black ones. Everything, even to the piloting of the vessels and the selection of the proper points for cannonading, was done by my own soldiers."
— Excerpt from February 1, 1863 report by Colonel T. W. Higginson, commander of the First Regiment South Carolina Volunteers (Union) after the January 23 - February 1, 1863 Expedition from Beaufort South Carolina, up the Saint Mary’s River in Georgia and Florida.
http://www.drbronsontours.com/bronson33rduscthistoryandstaugmembers.html

Unidentified Soldiers Of The 33rd United States Colored Troops

The 33rd was oganized January 31, 1863 or February 8, 1864, as 1st South Carolina Volunteers Colored Infantry. Attached to U. S. Forces, Port Royal Island, South Carolina, 10th Corps, Dept. of the South, to April, 1864. Mustered out January 31, 1866

"No officer in this regiment now doubts that the key to the successful prosecution of this war lies in the unlimited employment of black troops. Their superiority lies simply in the fact that they know the country, while white troops do not, and, moreover, that they have peculiarities of temperament, position, and motive which belong to them alone. Instead of leaving their homes and families to fight they are fighting for their homes and families, and they show the resolution and sagacity which a personal purpose gives. It would have been madness to attempt, with the bravest white troops what I have successfully accomplished with the black ones. Everything, even to the piloting of the vessels and the selection of the proper points for cannonading, was done by my own soldiers."

— Excerpt from February 1, 1863 report by Colonel T. W. Higginson, commander of the First Regiment South Carolina Volunteers (Union) after the January 23 - February 1, 1863 Expedition from Beaufort South Carolina, up the Saint Mary’s River in Georgia and Florida.

http://www.drbronsontours.com/bronson33rduscthistoryandstaugmembers.html

Henry O. Nightingale- Eyewitness To History-
The Assassination Of Abraham Lincoln
His 1865 diary describes one of the most infamous events in American history. On April 14, Nightingale attended a performance at Ford’s Theatre. There, he witnessed the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln by John Wilkes Booth. Nightingale recounted the horrific scene, writing:
Transcription
A beautiful April day. Remained all day in the Hospital. In the evening, attended Ford’s Theatre and in the last act a most astounding crime was committed the President; Mr. Lincoln, shot through the head, the assassin then leaped out of the box on the stage and drew a large dagger and exclaimed “I have done it. Virginia is avenged. Sic semper tyrannis” and made his escape. the President was conveyed to a neighboring house in dying condition. a fearful night is this. Other [monstrous] crimes the Secretary of State his sons and [illegible] servants staffed found [illegible] God pit the rebellion now for men, will how no mercy death to every Confederate my Rebel sympathies, intense excitement all over the City. is under Martial Law. 

Henry O. Nightingale (1844-1919) was an abolitionist from Rochester, New York who at 18 years of age enlisted in the Northern army at the start of the Civil War. Nightingale fought in numerous battles, including the Battle of Gettysburg.
    Read Nightingale’s account of Lincoln’s assassination
Zoom Info
Henry O. Nightingale- Eyewitness To History-
The Assassination Of Abraham Lincoln
His 1865 diary describes one of the most infamous events in American history. On April 14, Nightingale attended a performance at Ford’s Theatre. There, he witnessed the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln by John Wilkes Booth. Nightingale recounted the horrific scene, writing:
Transcription
A beautiful April day. Remained all day in the Hospital. In the evening, attended Ford’s Theatre and in the last act a most astounding crime was committed the President; Mr. Lincoln, shot through the head, the assassin then leaped out of the box on the stage and drew a large dagger and exclaimed “I have done it. Virginia is avenged. Sic semper tyrannis” and made his escape. the President was conveyed to a neighboring house in dying condition. a fearful night is this. Other [monstrous] crimes the Secretary of State his sons and [illegible] servants staffed found [illegible] God pit the rebellion now for men, will how no mercy death to every Confederate my Rebel sympathies, intense excitement all over the City. is under Martial Law. 

Henry O. Nightingale (1844-1919) was an abolitionist from Rochester, New York who at 18 years of age enlisted in the Northern army at the start of the Civil War. Nightingale fought in numerous battles, including the Battle of Gettysburg.
    Read Nightingale’s account of Lincoln’s assassination
Zoom Info

Henry O. Nightingale- Eyewitness To History-

The Assassination Of Abraham Lincoln

His 1865 diary describes one of the most infamous events in American history. On April 14, Nightingale attended a performance at Ford’s Theatre. There, he witnessed the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln by John Wilkes Booth. Nightingale recounted the horrific scene, writing:

Transcription

A beautiful April day. Remained all day in the Hospital. In the evening, attended Ford’s Theatre and in the last act a most astounding crime was committed the President; Mr. Lincoln, shot through the head, the assassin then leaped out of the box on the stage and drew a large dagger and exclaimed “I have done it. Virginia is avenged. Sic semper tyrannis” and made his escape. the President was conveyed to a neighboring house in dying condition. a fearful night is this. Other [monstrous] crimes the Secretary of State his sons and [illegible] servants staffed found [illegible] God pit the rebellion now for men, will how no mercy death to every Confederate my Rebel sympathies, intense excitement all over the City. is under Martial Law.
Henry O. Nightingale (1844-1919) was an abolitionist from Rochester, New York who at 18 years of age enlisted in the Northern army at the start of the Civil War. Nightingale fought in numerous battles, including the Battle of Gettysburg.

    Read Nightingale’s account of Lincoln’s assassination

 Many Civil War Battlefields Are Threatened By Development
Photo: Buddy Secor’s photo of the Pelham cannon in Spotsylvania won second place in the “preservation threats’ category
The United States government has identified 384 battles that had a significant impact on the larger war.  Many of these battlefields have been developed—turned into shopping malls, pizza parlors, housing developments, etc.—and many more are threatened by development.  Since the end of the Civil War, veterans and other citizens have struggled to preserve the fields on which Americans fought and died.  The Civil War Trust and its partners have preserved more than 36,000 acres of battlefield land.
"Nothing creates an emotional connection between present and past like walking in the footsteps of our Civil War soldiers," -Civil War author Jeff Shaara
~What if one day we can no longer walk there?
PRESERVATION VIRGINIA ANNOUNCES 2014 MOST ENDANGERED SITES LIST
Virginia’s Civil War Battlefields
(Bristoe Station Battlefield and Williamsburg Battlefield)
Threat:  Both battlefield sites are threatened by encroaching development, both immediate and longer term.
Southside Roller Mill, Chase City
Threat:  The Southside Roller Mill’s private owner struggles to maintain and shield the structure from the ravages of time and weather, but, as in many rural towns, funds are generally insufficient for feasibility planning and rehabilitating the structure for a new community use.  
Virginia’s “Sidestepped” Towns: Columbia and Pamplin City
Threat:  The towns of Columbia and Pamplin City are similar in that their historic periods of greatest prosperity are behind them, as a result of evolving patterns of circulation and modes of transportation, but their immediate threats and opportunities for renewed success are divergent.
James River Viewshed
Threat:  A proposed Dominion Virginia Power transmission line project would cross 4.1 miles of the river atop as many as 17 towers ranging in height from 160 feet to 295 feet, compromising the scenic integrity of the historic cultural areas that comprise the James River. The towers and power lines would intrude on the public vantage points from the Historic Triangle, which includes the Colonial Parkway, Jamestown Island’s Black Point and Carter’s Grove Plantation, as well as water routes on the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Trail. The National Trust for Historic Preservation named the resource to its 2013 list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.
Hook-Powell-Moorman Farm
Threat:  Much like the Booker T. Washington National Monument, located three miles away and listed as a Most Endangered Site in 2009, the Hook-Powell-Moorman farmstead is threatened by encroaching development along Route 122 and nearby Smith Mountain Lake.
Historic Schools In Virginia
Threat:  As budgets tighten and populations increase, increasingly there are frequent calls for the closure or demolition of historic school buildings across the state.
The Old Concrete Road
Threat:  While the mountain is under conservation easement, and is well-loved by both Roanoke citizens and its caretakers, the City of Roanoke’s Department of Parks and Recreation, it is recognized that the “rubble” retaining walls lining the road are suffering from deterioration and damage in multiple spots, due to root intrusion and normal freeze/thaw cycles and general wear and tear.
Pocahontas Island Historic District
Threat:  Residents and stewards of Pocahontas Island’s history have been unable to generate the necessary funds to fully interpret the site’s Underground Railroad narrative. The privately-owned house on Witten Street and the City of Petersburg-owned Jarratt House both suffer from years of neglect as a result of a lack of funding and need stabilization and repair. While some repairs have been made to the Jarratt House in the past decade, a portion of the rear wall collapsed several years ago.
Phlegar Building (Old Clerk’s Office)
Threat:  Deferred maintenance has taken its toll on the exterior of the building and the lack of a preservation plan makes its future uncertain.
Shockoe Bottom
Threat:  The public-private Revitalize RVA Plan contemplates intensive construction and redevelopment within the Shockoe Bottom flood plain, including a stadium, hotel, grocery store, retail space, office buildings, apartment buildings, parking garages, highway off-ramp modifications, and storm water flood-control infrastructure. These activities are likely to adversely impact historic and archaeological resources that are listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places (including those located within the Shockoe Valley & Tobacco Row Historic District and those identified in a multiple-property listing entitled The Slave Trade as a Commercial Enterprise in Richmond, Virginia).
Waterloo Bridge
Threat:  Waterloo Bridge was used for vehicular traffic until January 2014 when it was closed for reasons of safety; the wear and tear of sustained use and structural deficiencies in its iron material were no longer able to sustain a practical weight limit.   
READ THE STORIES OF THESE PRESERVATION SITES  HERE: http://preservationvirginia.org/press-room/release/2014-most-endangered-historic-sites-list-press-release
http://www.civilwar.org/education/history/10-facts-about-the-civil-war/
http://www.freelancestar.com/2013-11-04/articles/21780/battlefield-image-is-tops-stafford-amateur-wins-national-contest/

Many Civil War Battlefields Are Threatened By Development

Photo: Buddy Secor’s photo of the Pelham cannon in Spotsylvania won second place in the “preservation threats’ category

The United States government has identified 384 battles that had a significant impact on the larger war.  Many of these battlefields have been developed—turned into shopping malls, pizza parlors, housing developments, etc.—and many more are threatened by development.  Since the end of the Civil War, veterans and other citizens have struggled to preserve the fields on which Americans fought and died.  The Civil War Trust and its partners have preserved more than 36,000 acres of battlefield land.

"Nothing creates an emotional connection between present and past like walking in the footsteps of our Civil War soldiers," -Civil War author Jeff Shaara

~What if one day we can no longer walk there?

PRESERVATION VIRGINIA ANNOUNCES 2014 MOST ENDANGERED SITES LIST

Virginias Civil War Battlefields

(Bristoe Station Battlefield and Williamsburg Battlefield)

Threat Both battlefield sites are threatened by encroaching development, both immediate and longer term.

Southside Roller Mill, Chase City

Threat:  The Southside Roller Mill’s private owner struggles to maintain and shield the structure from the ravages of time and weather, but, as in many rural towns, funds are generally insufficient for feasibility planning and rehabilitating the structure for a new community use.  

Virginias SidesteppedTowns: Columbia and Pamplin City

Threat:  The towns of Columbia and Pamplin City are similar in that their historic periods of greatest prosperity are behind them, as a result of evolving patterns of circulation and modes of transportation, but their immediate threats and opportunities for renewed success are divergent.

James River Viewshed

Threat A proposed Dominion Virginia Power transmission line project would cross 4.1 miles of the river atop as many as 17 towers ranging in height from 160 feet to 295 feet, compromising the scenic integrity of the historic cultural areas that comprise the James River. The towers and power lines would intrude on the public vantage points from the Historic Triangle, which includes the Colonial Parkway, Jamestown Island’s Black Point and Carter’s Grove Plantation, as well as water routes on the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Trail. The National Trust for Historic Preservation named the resource to its 2013 list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.

Hook-Powell-Moorman Farm

Threat:  Much like the Booker T. Washington National Monument, located three miles away and listed as a Most Endangered Site in 2009, the Hook-Powell-Moorman farmstead is threatened by encroaching development along Route 122 and nearby Smith Mountain Lake.

Historic Schools In Virginia

Threat:  As budgets tighten and populations increase, increasingly there are frequent calls for the closure or demolition of historic school buildings across the state.

The Old Concrete Road

Threat:  While the mountain is under conservation easement, and is well-loved by both Roanoke citizens and its caretakers, the City of Roanoke’s Department of Parks and Recreation, it is recognized that the “rubble” retaining walls lining the road are suffering from deterioration and damage in multiple spots, due to root intrusion and normal freeze/thaw cycles and general wear and tear.

Pocahontas Island Historic District

Threat Residents and stewards of Pocahontas Island’s history have been unable to generate the necessary funds to fully interpret the site’s Underground Railroad narrative. The privately-owned house on Witten Street and the City of Petersburg-owned Jarratt House both suffer from years of neglect as a result of a lack of funding and need stabilization and repair. While some repairs have been made to the Jarratt House in the past decade, a portion of the rear wall collapsed several years ago.

Phlegar Building (Old Clerks Office)

Threat:  Deferred maintenance has taken its toll on the exterior of the building and the lack of a preservation plan makes its future uncertain.

Shockoe Bottom

Threat The public-private Revitalize RVA Plan contemplates intensive construction and redevelopment within the Shockoe Bottom flood plain, including a stadium, hotel, grocery store, retail space, office buildings, apartment buildings, parking garages, highway off-ramp modifications, and storm water flood-control infrastructure. These activities are likely to adversely impact historic and archaeological resources that are listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places (including those located within the Shockoe Valley & Tobacco Row Historic District and those identified in a multiple-property listing entitled The Slave Trade as a Commercial Enterprise in Richmond, Virginia).

Waterloo Bridge

Threat:  Waterloo Bridge was used for vehicular traffic until January 2014 when it was closed for reasons of safety; the wear and tear of sustained use and structural deficiencies in its iron material were no longer able to sustain a practical weight limit.   

READ THE STORIES OF THESE PRESERVATION SITES  HERE: http://preservationvirginia.org/press-room/release/2014-most-endangered-historic-sites-list-press-release

http://www.civilwar.org/education/history/10-facts-about-the-civil-war/

http://www.freelancestar.com/2013-11-04/articles/21780/battlefield-image-is-tops-stafford-amateur-wins-national-contest/

Two Unidentified Soldiers In Union Uniforms Drinking Whiskey And Playing Cards


WHISKEY SKIN 1 wine glass Scotch or Irish whiskey 1 piece of lemon peel Add the above to a tumbler and fill one-half full of boiling water. This is called a Columbia Skin in Boston.From Bon-Vivant’s Companion by Jerry Thomas, 1862.
Thomas finished The Bar-Tender’s Guide (alternately titled How to Mix Drinks or The Bon-Vivant’s Companion), the first drink book ever published in the United States. The book collected and codified what was then an oral tradition of recipes from the early days of cocktails, including some of his own creations; the guide laid down the principles for formulating mixed drinks of all categories
Digital ID:  (digital file from original item) ppmsca 33415 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.33415 
Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-33415 (digital file from original item)
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Two Unidentified Soldiers In Union Uniforms Drinking Whiskey And Playing Cards

WHISKEY SKIN

1 wine glass Scotch or Irish whiskey
1 piece of lemon peel

Add the above to a tumbler and fill one-half full of boiling water. This is called a Columbia Skin in Boston.
From Bon-Vivant’s Companion by Jerry Thomas, 1862.

Thomas finished The Bar-Tender’s Guide (alternately titled How to Mix Drinks or The Bon-Vivant’s Companion), the first drink book ever published in the United States. The book collected and codified what was then an oral tradition of recipes from the early days of cocktails, including some of his own creations; the guide laid down the principles for formulating mixed drinks of all categories

Three Unidentified Soldiers Playing Cards, Smoking, And Drinking In Front Of American Flag
Liquor- One soldier analyzed one issue of whiskey and with a straight face adjudged it to be a combination of “bark juice, tar-water, turpentine, brown sugar, lamp-oil and alcohol.” The potency of the liquor is readily evident from some of the nicknames given to it: “Old Red Eye,” “Rifle Knock-Knee,” “How Come You So,” and “Help Me to Sleep, Mother.”
Gambling- “The temptations that will beset you will be very great,” a Mississippi man, already a veteran in the Civil War, warned his newly enlisted younger brother. The evil he warned of wasn’t treason or desertion or theft. It was cards. “Of all the evil practices that abound in Camp, gambling is the most pernicious and fraught with the most direful consequences.”
Smoking-By the 1800’s, many people had begun using small amounts of tobacco. Some chewed it. Others smoked it occasionally in a pipe, or they hand-rolled a cigarette or cigar. On the average, people smoked about 40 cigarettes a year. The first commercial cigarettes were made in 1865 by Washington Duke on his 300-acre farm in Raleigh, North Carolina. His hand-rolled cigarettes were sold to soldiers at the end of the Civil War.
PHOTO: Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
http://www.nps.gov/history/history/online_books/civil_war_series/3/sec3.htm
http://healthliteracy.worlded.org/docs/tobacco/Unit1/2history_of.html
 The life of Johnny Reb: The Common Soldier of the Confederacy by Bell Irvin Wiley

Three Unidentified Soldiers Playing Cards, Smoking, And Drinking In Front Of American Flag

  • Liquor- One soldier analyzed one issue of whiskey and with a straight face adjudged it to be a combination of “bark juice, tar-water, turpentine, brown sugar, lamp-oil and alcohol.” The potency of the liquor is readily evident from some of the nicknames given to it: “Old Red Eye,” “Rifle Knock-Knee,” “How Come You So,” and “Help Me to Sleep, Mother.”
  • Gambling- “The temptations that will beset you will be very great,” a Mississippi man, already a veteran in the Civil War, warned his newly enlisted younger brother. The evil he warned of wasn’t treason or desertion or theft. It was cards. “Of all the evil practices that abound in Camp, gambling is the most pernicious and fraught with the most direful consequences.”
  • Smoking-By the 1800’s, many people had begun using small amounts of tobacco. Some chewed it. Others smoked it occasionally in a pipe, or they hand-rolled a cigarette or cigar. On the average, people smoked about 40 cigarettes a year. The first commercial cigarettes were made in 1865 by Washington Duke on his 300-acre farm in Raleigh, North Carolina. His hand-rolled cigarettes were sold to soldiers at the end of the Civil War.

 Gangrene And Flesh Eating Maggots In The American Civil War
 This 1860’s photo was used as a teaching aid in medical schools. National Library of Medicine
The biggest killer in the U.S Civil War was not instant death by bullet or by cannonball: it was disease resulting from wounds. An estimated 388,500 men died from wounds and other illnesses, including gangrene. Doctors with dirty hands unknowingly infected wounds with gangrene-causing bacteria while trying to treat the injured soldiers.
Gangrene is a condition in which living tissue (skin, muscle, or bone) dies and decays. Gangrene most often affects the legs, feet, arms, and fingers, but it also can affect internal organs such as the intestine or gallbladder. Gangrene can occur when blood flow to an area of the body is blocked or when certain types of bacteria  *  invade a wound.
During the war, doctors noticed that the wounds of some of the soldiers were infested with maggots, which are the larvae of houseflies or blowflies. Those maggot-infested wounds tended to heal faster than those without maggots, because the maggots were eating the dead or decaying tissue that resulted from gangrene infection. Thus, the maggots were cleaning out the dead and decaying tissue, allowing the remaining tissue to heal. They were doing the work that surgeons do today to treat gangrene through Debridement of wounds.

Read more: http://www.humanillnesses.com/original/E-Ga/Gangrene.html#ixzz38QJYnLRQ
http://blog.cleveland.com/metro/2009/11/post_111.html
Zoom Info
 Gangrene And Flesh Eating Maggots In The American Civil War
 This 1860’s photo was used as a teaching aid in medical schools. National Library of Medicine
The biggest killer in the U.S Civil War was not instant death by bullet or by cannonball: it was disease resulting from wounds. An estimated 388,500 men died from wounds and other illnesses, including gangrene. Doctors with dirty hands unknowingly infected wounds with gangrene-causing bacteria while trying to treat the injured soldiers.
Gangrene is a condition in which living tissue (skin, muscle, or bone) dies and decays. Gangrene most often affects the legs, feet, arms, and fingers, but it also can affect internal organs such as the intestine or gallbladder. Gangrene can occur when blood flow to an area of the body is blocked or when certain types of bacteria  *  invade a wound.
During the war, doctors noticed that the wounds of some of the soldiers were infested with maggots, which are the larvae of houseflies or blowflies. Those maggot-infested wounds tended to heal faster than those without maggots, because the maggots were eating the dead or decaying tissue that resulted from gangrene infection. Thus, the maggots were cleaning out the dead and decaying tissue, allowing the remaining tissue to heal. They were doing the work that surgeons do today to treat gangrene through Debridement of wounds.

Read more: http://www.humanillnesses.com/original/E-Ga/Gangrene.html#ixzz38QJYnLRQ
http://blog.cleveland.com/metro/2009/11/post_111.html
Zoom Info

 Gangrene And Flesh Eating Maggots In The American Civil War

  • This 1860’s photo was used as a teaching aid in medical schools. National Library of Medicine

The biggest killer in the U.S Civil War was not instant death by bullet or by cannonball: it was disease resulting from wounds. An estimated 388,500 men died from wounds and other illnesses, including gangrene. Doctors with dirty hands unknowingly infected wounds with gangrene-causing bacteria while trying to treat the injured soldiers.

Gangrene is a condition in which living tissue (skin, muscle, or bone) dies and decays. Gangrene most often affects the legs, feet, arms, and fingers, but it also can affect internal organs such as the intestine or gallbladder. Gangrene can occur when blood flow to an area of the body is blocked or when certain types of bacteria * invade a wound.

During the war, doctors noticed that the wounds of some of the soldiers were infested with maggots, which are the larvae of houseflies or blowflies. Those maggot-infested wounds tended to heal faster than those without maggots, because the maggots were eating the dead or decaying tissue that resulted from gangrene infection. Thus, the maggots were cleaning out the dead and decaying tissue, allowing the remaining tissue to heal. They were doing the work that surgeons do today to treat gangrene through Debridement of wounds.

http://blog.cleveland.com/metro/2009/11/post_111.html

The “Army Itch:” A Medical Mystery Of The American Civil War
The Civil War happened at the end of the medical dark ages or, conversely, at the beginning of the modern medical era. Dr. Walker’s scrapbooks and The Photographic Atlas of Skin Diseases.
A photomicrograph of an itch mite (Sarcoptes scabiei)
"Camp Itch" was a painful skin disease, involving itching, lesions, and inflammation, suffered by soldiers both North and South during the Civil War. Doctors debated the cause of the itch. Certainly some cases were really scabies, a very contagious skin disease caused by mites and quickly spread by shared blankets as well as in crowded conditions. Some doctors, however, stated that camp itch was not scabies as no "animaliculae" were present.
Whether scabies or not, the itch resulted from the poor hygiene of troops who bathed infrequently, suffered numerous scratches and bites, and were generally very dirty. Then, when afflicted, the men scratched, making the problem worse. The itch became so severe in some cases that 31,947 Union troops and quite a number of Confederates had to be hospitalized for treatment of the infections that followed.
http://books.google.com/books?id=fVZeGtxiMcYC&pg=PA59&lpg=PA59&dq=encyclopedia+of+civil+war+medicine+scabies&source=bl&ots=RwwHrDQbM9&sig=sObVaVEk3M9U42AzOcuUEAwX468&hl=en&sa=X&ei=jHHRU5ntJ9KAogTMwYLYCw&ved=0CB0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=encyclopedia%20of%20civil%20war%20medicine%20scabies&f=false
Zoom Info
The “Army Itch:” A Medical Mystery Of The American Civil War
The Civil War happened at the end of the medical dark ages or, conversely, at the beginning of the modern medical era. Dr. Walker’s scrapbooks and The Photographic Atlas of Skin Diseases.
A photomicrograph of an itch mite (Sarcoptes scabiei)
"Camp Itch" was a painful skin disease, involving itching, lesions, and inflammation, suffered by soldiers both North and South during the Civil War. Doctors debated the cause of the itch. Certainly some cases were really scabies, a very contagious skin disease caused by mites and quickly spread by shared blankets as well as in crowded conditions. Some doctors, however, stated that camp itch was not scabies as no "animaliculae" were present.
Whether scabies or not, the itch resulted from the poor hygiene of troops who bathed infrequently, suffered numerous scratches and bites, and were generally very dirty. Then, when afflicted, the men scratched, making the problem worse. The itch became so severe in some cases that 31,947 Union troops and quite a number of Confederates had to be hospitalized for treatment of the infections that followed.
http://books.google.com/books?id=fVZeGtxiMcYC&pg=PA59&lpg=PA59&dq=encyclopedia+of+civil+war+medicine+scabies&source=bl&ots=RwwHrDQbM9&sig=sObVaVEk3M9U42AzOcuUEAwX468&hl=en&sa=X&ei=jHHRU5ntJ9KAogTMwYLYCw&ved=0CB0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=encyclopedia%20of%20civil%20war%20medicine%20scabies&f=false
Zoom Info
The “Army Itch:” A Medical Mystery Of The American Civil War
The Civil War happened at the end of the medical dark ages or, conversely, at the beginning of the modern medical era. Dr. Walker’s scrapbooks and The Photographic Atlas of Skin Diseases.
A photomicrograph of an itch mite (Sarcoptes scabiei)
"Camp Itch" was a painful skin disease, involving itching, lesions, and inflammation, suffered by soldiers both North and South during the Civil War. Doctors debated the cause of the itch. Certainly some cases were really scabies, a very contagious skin disease caused by mites and quickly spread by shared blankets as well as in crowded conditions. Some doctors, however, stated that camp itch was not scabies as no "animaliculae" were present.
Whether scabies or not, the itch resulted from the poor hygiene of troops who bathed infrequently, suffered numerous scratches and bites, and were generally very dirty. Then, when afflicted, the men scratched, making the problem worse. The itch became so severe in some cases that 31,947 Union troops and quite a number of Confederates had to be hospitalized for treatment of the infections that followed.
http://books.google.com/books?id=fVZeGtxiMcYC&pg=PA59&lpg=PA59&dq=encyclopedia+of+civil+war+medicine+scabies&source=bl&ots=RwwHrDQbM9&sig=sObVaVEk3M9U42AzOcuUEAwX468&hl=en&sa=X&ei=jHHRU5ntJ9KAogTMwYLYCw&ved=0CB0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=encyclopedia%20of%20civil%20war%20medicine%20scabies&f=false
Zoom Info

The “Army Itch:” A Medical Mystery Of The American Civil War

The Civil War happened at the end of the medical dark ages or, conversely, at the beginning of the modern medical era. Dr. Walker’s scrapbooks and The Photographic Atlas of Skin Diseases.

"Camp Itch" was a painful skin disease, involving itching, lesions, and inflammation, suffered by soldiers both North and South during the Civil War. Doctors debated the cause of the itch. Certainly some cases were really scabies, a very contagious skin disease caused by mites and quickly spread by shared blankets as well as in crowded conditions. Some doctors, however, stated that camp itch was not scabies as no "animaliculae" were present.

Whether scabies or not, the itch resulted from the poor hygiene of troops who bathed infrequently, suffered numerous scratches and bites, and were generally very dirty. Then, when afflicted, the men scratched, making the problem worse. The itch became so severe in some cases that 31,947 Union troops and quite a number of Confederates had to be hospitalized for treatment of the infections that followed.

http://books.google.com/books?id=fVZeGtxiMcYC&pg=PA59&lpg=PA59&dq=encyclopedia+of+civil+war+medicine+scabies&source=bl&ots=RwwHrDQbM9&sig=sObVaVEk3M9U42AzOcuUEAwX468&hl=en&sa=X&ei=jHHRU5ntJ9KAogTMwYLYCw&ved=0CB0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=encyclopedia%20of%20civil%20war%20medicine%20scabies&f=false

VOICES FROM THE CIVIL WAR

M. Brock, a Union soldier stationed in Leesburg, watched in 1863 as three of his fellow soldiers, seated on the edges of coffins, were shot.

"They all fell backward into their coffins and remained as they fell until the whole Column passed them," he wrote. "Melancholy sight to Witness — shot for Deserting."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/11/05/AR2010110502726.html

CIVIL WAR LOVE LETTER-
Letter from unknown soldier writing from Nashville, Tennessee, to his friend Ettie . He writes that he wants to get married when he returns home from army life and asks her to tell any good-looking, amiable young women she knows that he is available.

Nashville Tenn Jany 5th 64


Friend Ettie

I believe I am not indebted to you by way of letter, but for your kindness to me I will write you a few lines. It is quite cool Weather here now and some snow upon the ground but not enough to make sleighing. I wish I wish I were in Hillsdale today I think I would call around to friend Ettie and go out a Sleighing. I get lonesome sometimes and I not know what to do, if I ever get out of the Service alive I am agoing to settle down and get married.

What a novel Idea that is, perhaps you will not believe it but I am not joking. I am not quite an old Bach yet but I fear I will be before long.

If you know of some good looking amiable young Lady that wish to change her situation in life, just mention the fact to her, and tell her there is a Soldier in the Army that wishes to marry in less than two years after his time expires in the Army.

On New Year’s day about one o-clock I received a verry nice gift which I appreciated verry much. It was the only gift that I received, and on that account realize its worth. You have my heartfelt thanks for your kindness and remembrance of a Soldier. Enclosed you will find the likeness of your unknown Correspondent which you will please accept, with the kindest regards.


I am yours
verry truly

http://spec.lib.vt.edu/cwlove/friendettie.html

Duryee’s Zouaves, Fort Schuyler Adjuant Mess
"I doubt whether it had an equal, and certainly no superior among all the regiments of the Army of the Potomac." - General George Sykes, speaking of the 5th New York Infantry
Duryee’s Zouaves: The 5th New York Volunteer Infantry
The 5th New York Volunteer Infantry, “Duryée’s Zouaves,” was one of the most renowned fighting regiments of the American Civil War. Their colorful Zouave uniform, precise maneuvers, effectiveness in combat and steady bearing under fire, won them universal respect and recognition. Many observers considered the 5th New York to be the best-drilled volunteer unit in the Federal Army. In addition to a casualty list that totalled 211 dead out of 1,508 men borne on the rolls, nine of its soldiers attained the rank of general - five the full rank, and four by brevet.
Date: May 18, 1861
Medium: Albumen silver print from glass negative
Dimensions: 5 9/16 x 7 1/2
Classification: Photographs
Credit Line: Gilman Collection, Museum Purchase, 2005
http://www.zouave.org/
Photographer- Stacy (American, active 1860s) 
http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/285894

Duryee’s Zouaves, Fort Schuyler Adjuant Mess

"I doubt whether it had an equal, and certainly no superior among all the regiments of the Army of the Potomac."
- General George Sykes, speaking of the 5th New York Infantry

Duryee’s Zouaves: The 5th New York Volunteer Infantry

The 5th New York Volunteer Infantry, “Duryée’s Zouaves,” was one of the most renowned fighting regiments of the American Civil War. Their colorful Zouave uniform, precise maneuvers, effectiveness in combat and steady bearing under fire, won them universal respect and recognition. Many observers considered the 5th New York to be the best-drilled volunteer unit in the Federal Army. In addition to a casualty list that totalled 211 dead out of 1,508 men borne on the rolls, nine of its soldiers attained the rank of general - five the full rank, and four by brevet.

Date: May 18, 1861
Medium: Albumen silver print from glass negative
Dimensions: 5 9/16 x 7 1/2
Classification: Photographs
Credit Line: Gilman Collection, Museum Purchase, 2005
Photographer- Stacy (American, active 1860s)
[Four Officers]
Alexander Gardner  (American, Glasgow, Scotland 1821–1882 Washington, D.C.)
Despite decades of painstaking research by dedicated historians and Civil War buffs, a large number of the era’s photographs remain unidentified,
Including this portrait of four officers in the field. What is known is that the two men in the center wear forage caps featuring a round, sloping leather brim made popular by Gen. Irvin McDowell (leader of the Union troops during the first battle of Bull Run). The other men wear regulation U.S. officer’s slouch hats.

Date: ca. 1864
Medium: Albumen silver print from glass negative
Dimensions: Image: 17.8 x 22.8 cm (7 x 9 in.)
Classification: Photographs
Credit Line: Gilman Collection, Purchase, Sam Salz Foundation Gift, 2005
Accession Number: 2005.100.563
http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/286442

[Four Officers]

Alexander Gardner
(American, Glasgow, Scotland 1821–1882 Washington, D.C.)

Despite decades of painstaking research by dedicated historians and Civil War buffs, a large number of the era’s photographs remain unidentified,

Including this portrait of four officers in the field. What is known is that the two men in the center wear forage caps featuring a round, sloping leather brim made popular by Gen. Irvin McDowell (leader of the Union troops during the first battle of Bull Run). The other men wear regulation U.S. officer’s slouch hats.

Date: ca. 1864
Medium: Albumen silver print from glass negative
Dimensions: Image: 17.8 x 22.8 cm (7 x 9 in.)
Classification: Photographs
Credit Line: Gilman Collection, Purchase, Sam Salz Foundation Gift, 2005
Accession Number: 2005.100.563
[William Snodgrass of an unidentified Virginia infantry regiment with underhammer pistol]
Digital ID:  (digital file from original item) ppmsca 37272 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.37272 
Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-37272 (digital file from original item)
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

[William Snodgrass of an unidentified Virginia infantry regiment with underhammer pistol]

[William Snodgrass of an unidentified Virginia infantry regiment with underhammer pistol]
Digital ID:  (digital file from original item) ppmsca 37272 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.37272 
Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-37272 (digital file from original item)
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

[William Snodgrass of an unidentified Virginia infantry regiment with underhammer pistol]