Sixth Plate Ambrotype Of Three Civil War Brothers From Indiana

In civilian clothes with pencil notation in back of case that reads,Isaac J. Wesley R. Smith J/all true soldiers/the star spangled banner/long may it wave. Consignor attributed the brothers to the three-month 118th Indiana Infantry. Cowan’s Auctions 

Indiana regiments played significant roles in the war. For example, the Nineteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment, part of the famed Iron Brigade, fought valiantly at the Battle of Antietam and at Gettysburg. Other Hoosier regiments participated in battles at Shiloh, Chancellorsville, Chickamauga, Vicksburg and others.

Reference: Indiana in the Civil War http://www.indianahistory.org/teachers-students/teacher-resources/classroom-tools/civil-war#.VEQYbfldVIk

Washington Along Pennsylvania Ave. Parade To Help Boost The Nation’s Morale - May 23 and 24, 1865, Sherman Later Called The Experience “the happiest and most satisfactory moment of my life.”

President Johnson’s grand review of the Union Army at the end of the Civil War was one of the greatest parades in the Nation’s history. During a 2-day period (May 23-24, 1865), approximately 200,000 troops. led by Gen. George G. Meade on the first day and Gen. William T. Sherman on the second, marched down Pennsylvania Avenue.(Library of Congress, Mathew B. Brady.)

May 23 was a clear, brilliantly sunny day. Starting from Capitol Hill, the Army of the Potomac marched down Pennsylvania Avenue before virtually the entire population of Washington, a throng of thousands cheering and singing favorite Union marching songs. At the reviewing stand in front of the White House were President Johnson, General-in-Chief Ulysses S. Grant, and top government officials. Leading the day’s march, General Meade dismounted in front of the stand and joined the dignitaries to watch the parade. His army made an awesome sight: a force of 80,000 infantrymen marching 12 across with impeccable precision, along with hundreds of pieces of artillery and a seven-mile line of cavalrymen that alone took an hour to pass. One already famous cavalry officer, George Armstrong Custer, gained the most attention that day-either by design or because his horse was spooked when he temporarily lost control of his mount, causing much excitement as he rode by the reviewing stand twice.

Source: The Civil War Society’s “Encyclopedia of the Civil War”

Major General E. O. C. Ord And Staff

Edward Otho Cresap Ord  1818 – 1883 was an American engineer and Army Officer officer who saw action in the Seminole War, the Indian Wars and the Civil War. He commanded an army during the final days of the Civil War, and was instrumental in forcing the surrender of General Robert E. Lee. He also designed Fort Sam Houston. He died in Havana, Cuba of Yellow Fever. 

  • There is a bust of Ord at Grant’s Tomb in New York City depicting him as one of five (Sherman, Thomas, McPherson, Sheridan and Ord) sentinels watching over the tomb of President Ulysses S. Grant.

Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Ord

General Bryan Grimes - Fights In And Survives Nearly All The Battles Of The Eastern Theater Of The Civil War- Only To Later Be Murdered

He was a member of one of the oldest and wealthiest families in North Carolina

Grimes saw frequent combat. Demonstrating great courage and fortitude, and often placing himself in great personal danger, he won rapid promotion and suffered many wounds. He was a North Carolina plantation owner and a general officer in the Confederate Army

1849: In 1849, his father gave him the Grimesland estate, along with control over its 100 slaves.
1861: He resigned from the commission after the passage of the Ordinance of Secession and joined the Confederate Army as the major of the newly formed 4th North Carolina Infantry on May 16, 1861.
1862: On June 19, 1862, Grimes was promoted to the rank of colonel and given command of the 4th North Carolina Infantry, now part of the Army of Northern Virginia.
1865: On February 15, 1865, he was promoted to major general, the last man appointed to that rank in the Army of Northern Virginia.
1865: Following the Appomattox Campaign, he surrendered along with the rest of the Army of Northern Virginia on April 9, 1865, and was paroled at Appomattox Court House.
1867: He subsequently moved back to Grimesland in January 1867 and resumed farming.
1880: In 1880, Grimes was ambushed and killed in Pitt County, North Carolina, by a hired assassin named William Parker, presumably to prevent him from testifying at a criminal trial. Although acquitted of Grimes’s murder, the assassin was lynched by an angry mob seven years later when he bragged that he had killed Grimes.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bryan_Grimes

http://blog.ecu.edu/sites/staffpick/eurl.axd/482b919b53b3494e9446bb0ae7799109/?p=570

Photo colorized by S.Palmer @TheCivilWarParlorTumblr.com

Unidentified Soldier in Union uniform of the 119th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, wearing the belt buckle of the Philadelphia Reserve Brigade

This regiment was recruited at Philadelphia in Aug., 1862, and ordered to Washington before its ranks were filled. Here an additional company was received and the regiment was mustered into the U. S. service for a three years’ term. In October it joined the Army of the Potomac near Antietam and was assigned to the 1st brigade, 2nd division, 6th corps.

It was first under fire at Fredericksburg and acquitted itself with credit, returning to camp at White Oak Church. With the 3d brigade, 1st division, it joined in the Chancellorsville movement, being engaged at Salem Church, and then returned to occupy the old camp until the Gettysburg campaign. The troops supported the cavalry engaged at Beverly ford and arrived on the field of Gettysburg on the afternoon of July 2.

The 119th was posted on the left of the line and did not become engaged, but immediately took up the pursuit after the battle and went into camp at Warrenton on July 26, where 205 substitutes were received. At Rappahannock Station in November, a gallant assault was made for which the 6th corps received special commendation by Gen. Meade. After participation in the Mine Run expedition, winter quarters were made near Brandy Station, which were occupied until May 4, 1864.

The regiment fought valiantly at the Wilderness and Spottsylvania, and by May 12 had lost half of its effective strength. At Cold Harbor it also sustained heavy loss. From Petersburg, where it moved with the army, the 119th was sent to the defense of Washington, which was threatened by Gen. Early, and took part in the marches and countermarches in the Valley of the Shenandoah and the battle of the Opequan. It was then posted at Winchester to garrison the town and returned to Petersburg early in December. It took part in the Dabney’s mill battle in Feb., 1865, the final assault on April 2, the battle of Sailor’s creek, and was present at Lee’s surrender, after which the regiment moved to Danville, but returned to Washington and Philadelphia where the troops were mustered out on June 19, 1865.

Regimental history taken from “The Union Army” by Federal Publishing Company, 1908 - Volume 1


 


"Oh, no, mix them up. I am tired of state’s rights."
-Maj. Gen. George Thomas in response to the question of whether to bury the Confederate dead according to state.
Casualties for the Union Army during the Battles for Chattanooga (Orchard Knob, Lookout Mountain, and Missionary Ridge) amounted to 5,824 (753 killed, 4,722 wounded, and 349 missing) of about 56,000 engaged; Confederate casualties were 6,667 (361 killed, 2,160 wounded, and 4,146 missing, mostly prisoners) of about 44,000. Southern losses may have been higher; Grant claimed 6,142 prisoners. In addition, the Union Army seized 40 cannons and 69 limbers and caissons. When a chaplain asked General Thomas whether the dead should be sorted and buried by state, Thomas replied “Mix ‘em up. I’m tired of states’ rights.”
Eicher, David J. The Longest Night: A Military History of the Civil War. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2001 page 613

Civil War Medicine Chest

Carried By Charles E. White- Seige of Port Hudson 1861 & ‘62D

Diseases contracted during the Civil War killed over twice as many men as bullets. Infections spread rapidly in overcrowded camps. Measles, mumps, rubella, and chicken pox ran rampant, particularly among newly-enlisted soldiers from rural areas who lacked immunities from prior exposure. But even more fatalities resulted from dysentery and diarrhea contracted due to unsanitary conditions.

http://antiquescientifica.com/web.civil_war_medical_box.htm

http://www.ozarkscivilwar.org/themes/medicine

Sylvester Magee - Slave And Civil War Soldier-  Was Likely The Last Living Human Being Who Possessed Any Firsthand Memory Of The Trials Of The Civil War Or Institutionalized Slavery

He was wounded twice in the Siege of Vicksburg and the Battle of Champion Hill.

Sylvester Magee’s obituary proclaimed him to be “The Last American Slave.” According to oral histories, Sylvester Magee was born in North Carolina on May 29, 1841 and sold at Enterprise, Mississippi. He was present at the Vicksburg siege and pressed into service in the Union army. Another source relates that Magee also had duties as a gravedigger in the Vicksburg burial details. By the mid-1960s, due to his advanced age, Sylvester Magee became nationally famous. On his 124th birthday the citizens of Collins, Mississippi threw him a party and Magee was sent a letter of congratulations from President Lyndon Johnson. Governor Paul Johnson even declared the day “Sylvester Magee Day.” Magee took his first flight to New York for a television appearance and later flew to Philadelphia to appear on the Mike Douglas Show.

He appeared in the March 1967 issue of Jet magazine, and was noted by President Richard Nixon as probably the oldest citizen of the United States, having been identified as the nation’s oldest living person by a life insurance company. When asked why he had lived so long, he simply stated that the Lord had been good to him. Reportedly, his last words were “Lord have mercy.” Sylvester Magee was likely the last living human being who possessed any firsthand memory of the trials of the Civil War or institutionalized slavery. 

Burial:
Pleasant Valley Cemetery
Foxworth
Marion County
Mississippi, USA

Reposted from Find a Grave- Pay your respects here: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=49460775

Brothers- Privates Thomas D. Hilliard And Colonel John Hilliard Of Co. C, 12th North Carolina Infantry Regiment, With Bowie Knives

Although many major battles did not occur in North Carolina, the state played an important role during the American Civil War…

The state provided more men (133, 905) for the Confederate cause, than any other state.  This number comprised approximately one-sixth of the Confederate fighting force.   Of that number, one sixth (approximately 20,000) became casualties of war.  Disease took approximately 20,000 Tar Heels lives, too.  According to historian Paul Escott, the state “had only about one-ninth of the Confederacy’s white population,” yet “it furnished one-sixth of its fighting men.”  In sum, 30-percent (approximately 40,000) of those fighting for the Confederacy died during the war.

http://www.northcarolinahistory.org/commentary/320/entry

Photo found on ebay http://www.ebay.com/itm/8-by-10-Civil-War-Photo-Print-2-Confederate-Soldiers-North-Carolina-Brothers-/351157320720?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item51c29b7c10

Credit Deb’s Lost Treasures and Original photo Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

North Carolina Confederate Stephen Dodson Ramseur-  I Was Mortally Wounded In The Battle Of Cedar Creek

He graduated from West Point at age twenty-three in June 1860. And went on to command the Ellis Light Artillery. On May 20, 1861, Ramseur’s artillery was posted on the State Capitol grounds during North Carolina’s secession debate. When the convention approved secession, Ramseur’s battery announced the historic moment by firing its cannons.

He served with distinction in 1862 and 1863, received a promotion to brigadier general, and suffered wounds three times. He also fell in love with his cousin Ellen Richmond and they married in 1863. During their months of separation, the couple wrote many loving letters to each other. Ramseur earned a promotion to major general for leading an attack that saved the Confederate army at Spotsylvania Courthouse in May 1864. While he was fighting in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley in the summer and fall of 1864, Ellen was at home awaiting the birth of their first child. On October 16, Ramseur received news that his wife had given birth and that all was well. But the message did not say whether the baby was a boy or a girl. Three days later, Ramseur was mortally wounded in the Battle of Cedar Creek, without knowing that he had a daughter.

He died of battle wounds on October 20, 1864, after sending his love to his family and requesting that a lock of his hair go to his wife. Federal troops returned his body to a boyhood friend, Confederate major general Robert F. Hoke. Ramseur’s body lay in state briefly in the capitol at Richmond, then went by train home to Lincolnton. Ramseur’s family was crushed by the news of his death. His widow, Ellen, and three-week-old daughter, Mary, could not travel from Caswell County for the funeral. Ellen Ramseur never remarried and wore black mourning clothing for the rest of her life. She remained with her family in Caswell County until she died in 1900 at the age of fifty-nine. Mary Ramseur never married and died at the age of seventy-one in 1935.

Reposted from http://moh.ncdcr.gov/exhibits/civilwar/explore_section4n.html

Alexander (Sandie) Swift Pendleton- I Was Mortally Wounded At Fisher’s Hill
He was asked by General Stonewall Jackson to join his staff as an ordnance officer —- Jackson had known Pendleton from their days together in Lexington, where Jackson was a Professor at the Virginia Military Institute. Pendleton subsequently served as Jackson’s Assistant Adjutant General (Second Corps), and the relationship between Pendleton and Jackson was a close one— it was said that Jackson “loved him like a son.”
Following Jackson’s death at Chancellorsville in May 1863, Pendleton remained as AAG under General Richard S. Ewell and would later serve under Gen. Jubal A. Early. Pendleton married Kate Corbin in December 1863, and the newlyweds were expecting their first child when he was mortally wounded at Fisher’s Hill on September 22, 1864. He died on September 23, and in October his body was returned to Lexington for burial. Kate Corbin Pendleton gave birth to a son, Sandie, in November 1864. The child contracted diphtheria and died in September 1865.
http://www.vmi.edu/archives.aspx?id=8165

Alexander (Sandie) Swift Pendleton- I Was Mortally Wounded At Fisher’s Hill

He was asked by General Stonewall Jackson to join his staff as an ordnance officer —- Jackson had known Pendleton from their days together in Lexington, where Jackson was a Professor at the Virginia Military Institute. Pendleton subsequently served as Jackson’s Assistant Adjutant General (Second Corps), and the relationship between Pendleton and Jackson was a close one— it was said that Jackson “loved him like a son.”

Following Jackson’s death at Chancellorsville in May 1863, Pendleton remained as AAG under General Richard S. Ewell and would later serve under Gen. Jubal A. Early. Pendleton married Kate Corbin in December 1863, and the newlyweds were expecting their first child when he was mortally wounded at Fisher’s Hill on September 22, 1864. He died on September 23, and in October his body was returned to Lexington for burial. Kate Corbin Pendleton gave birth to a son, Sandie, in November 1864. The child contracted diphtheria and died in September 1865.

http://www.vmi.edu/archives.aspx?id=8165

Unidentified Soldier In Union Sergeant’s Frock Coat And Forage Cap With Unidentified Woman In Dress And Hat With Veil Between 1861 And 1865

Layers Of Civil War Womens Clothing

List of the Civil War womens clothing that they wore starting next to the skin and working out in layers:

Layer 1
* Drawers (underpants) made of cotton or linen and trimmed with lace
* Chemise (long undershirt) usually made of linen
* Stockings held up with garters

Layer 2
* Corset or stays stiffened with whale bone
* Crinoline, hoop skirt, or 1 or 2 petticoats (dark color if traveling due to mud and dirt)

Layer 3
* Petticoat bodice, corset cover, or camisole

Layer 4
* Bodice
* Skirt, often held up with “braces” (suspenders)
* Belt
* Slippers made of satin, velvet, done in knit, or crochet

Layer 5 (outerwear for leaving the house)
* Shawl, jacket, or mantle
* Gloves or mitts
* Button up boots
* Parasol
* Bonnet or hat
* Bag or purse
* Handkerchief
* Fan sometimes made of sandalwood
* Watch pocket

Photo Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

http://www.visit-gettysburg.com/civil-war-womens-clothing.html

 Carlos Alvarez de la Mesa Was A Spanaird Who Came To The U.S. To Fight In The Civil War, And Fought At Gettysburg
The Spanish national immigrated to the U.S. in 1861 to join the Union Army and fight in the Civil War. Weeks after marrying into a family of “New England blue bloods,” the 32-year-old joined the “Garibaldi Guard.” Also called the 39th New York Infantry Volunteers, its companies were composed of ethnic Hungarians, Germans, Italians, Spaniards and other immigrants.
De la Mesa fought in the pivotal battle of Gettysburg. The officer received a gunshot wound to his foot as he leaped over a stone wall, and was trampled by his “entire company.” He suffered critical wounds across his body. Despite his illnesses, he went on to serve for years in the Veteran Reserve Corps before he died in an insane asylum from “disease of the brain” in 1872.
http://dmna.ny.gov/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/39thInf/deLaMesa/39thInf_Coll_deLaMesa_photo.htm
http://www.timesunion.com/default/article/War-letters-tell-poignant-tale-2208663.php

Carlos Alvarez de la Mesa Was A Spanaird Who Came To The U.S. To Fight In The Civil War, And Fought At Gettysburg

The Spanish national immigrated to the U.S. in 1861 to join the Union Army and fight in the Civil War. Weeks after marrying into a family of “New England blue bloods,” the 32-year-old joined the “Garibaldi Guard.” Also called the 39th New York Infantry Volunteers, its companies were composed of ethnic Hungarians, Germans, Italians, Spaniards and other immigrants.

De la Mesa fought in the pivotal battle of Gettysburg. The officer received a gunshot wound to his foot as he leaped over a stone wall, and was trampled by his “entire company.” He suffered critical wounds across his body. Despite his illnesses, he went on to serve for years in the Veteran Reserve Corps before he died in an insane asylum from “disease of the brain” in 1872.

http://dmna.ny.gov/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/39thInf/deLaMesa/39thInf_Coll_deLaMesa_photo.htm

http://www.timesunion.com/default/article/War-letters-tell-poignant-tale-2208663.php

The 1st And 15th Arkansas’ Famous Humanitarian Act
Privates Henry Clements and John McKamie Wilson Baird, of the “Jackson Guards”, A Prewar Volunteer Militia Company Which Became Company G, 1st Arkansas
During the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain on June 27, 1864, the 1st/15th Arkansas became involved in a famous humanitarian act. At one point in the battle, not far from the position known as the “Dead Angle”, the Union frontal assault had failed leaving hundreds of dead and wounded Union soldiers between the Confederate works and the Union lines.
The woods and brush between the two armies caught fire because of the gunfire and artillery. The fire began to creep toward the wounded soldiers. Lt. Colonel William P. Martin who was commanding the 1st and 15th combined Arkansas Regiments, jumped on the earthworks and ordered his Confederate soldiers to cease firing. He then waved a white flag of truce yelling to the Union soldiers to “come and get your wounded, they are burning to death.” For a short time the Union and Confederate soldiers helped remove the wounded and put out the fires. The next day the Union generals presented Martin with two Colt Revolvers as a thank you for his humanitarian efforts. Later the opposing forces began to fire at each other again.
Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield, The Civil War for Kids
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1st_Arkansas_Infantry_Regiment

The 1st And 15th Arkansas’ Famous Humanitarian Act

Privates Henry Clements and John McKamie Wilson Baird, of the “Jackson Guards”, A Prewar Volunteer Militia Company Which Became Company G, 1st Arkansas

During the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain on June 27, 1864, the 1st/15th Arkansas became involved in a famous humanitarian act. At one point in the battle, not far from the position known as the “Dead Angle”, the Union frontal assault had failed leaving hundreds of dead and wounded Union soldiers between the Confederate works and the Union lines.

The woods and brush between the two armies caught fire because of the gunfire and artillery. The fire began to creep toward the wounded soldiers. Lt. Colonel William P. Martin who was commanding the 1st and 15th combined Arkansas Regiments, jumped on the earthworks and ordered his Confederate soldiers to cease firing. He then waved a white flag of truce yelling to the Union soldiers to “come and get your wounded, they are burning to death.” For a short time the Union and Confederate soldiers helped remove the wounded and put out the fires. The next day the Union generals presented Martin with two Colt Revolvers as a thank you for his humanitarian efforts. Later the opposing forces began to fire at each other again.

Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield, The Civil War for Kids

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1st_Arkansas_Infantry_Regiment

Grand Rapids Resident Captain Samuel Judd of Company A Of The 3rd Michigan Infantry Regiment
He was born in Massachusetts in 1806 and killed at the battle of Fair Oaks in Virginia in 1862. 
More than 90,000 Michigan men, nearly a quarter of the state’s male population in 1860, served in the war. 14,753 Michigan soldiers died in service, roughly 1 of every 6 who served. 4,448 of these deaths were combat deaths while the majority, over 9000, were from disease, a constant fear in crowded army camps with poor food, sanitation and exposure issues and pre-modern medicine. This put Michigan’s loss at sixth highest among the Union states (the non-state U.S Colored Troops losses also exceeded Michigan’s).
When, at the beginning of the war, Michigan was asked to supply no more than four regiments Governor Austin Blair sent seven. Upon the arrival of Michigan’s 1st volunteers President Abraham Lincoln was prompted to remark, “Thank God for Michigan.”
http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2011/04/150_years_since_the_beginning.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michigan_in_the_American_Civil_War

Grand Rapids Resident Captain Samuel Judd of Company A Of The 3rd Michigan Infantry Regiment

He was born in Massachusetts in 1806 and killed at the battle of Fair Oaks in Virginia in 1862.

More than 90,000 Michigan men, nearly a quarter of the state’s male population in 1860, served in the war. 14,753 Michigan soldiers died in service, roughly 1 of every 6 who served. 4,448 of these deaths were combat deaths while the majority, over 9000, were from disease, a constant fear in crowded army camps with poor food, sanitation and exposure issues and pre-modern medicine. This put Michigan’s loss at sixth highest among the Union states (the non-state U.S Colored Troops losses also exceeded Michigan’s).

When, at the beginning of the war, Michigan was asked to supply no more than four regiments Governor Austin Blair sent seven. Upon the arrival of Michigan’s 1st volunteers President Abraham Lincoln was prompted to remark, “Thank God for Michigan.”

http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2011/04/150_years_since_the_beginning.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michigan_in_the_American_Civil_War

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