Hopkinson’s Plantation, Edisto Island, South Carolina 1862
Henry P. Moore (American, 1833–1911)
In late fall 1861 or spring 1862, Henry P. Moore, a New Hampshire photographer, traveled from his home in Concord to make portraits of the Third New Hampshire Regiment in camp in Union-occupied coastal South Carolina. While in residence, he made some of the earliest and most poignant Civil War photographs of slave life in the Deep South. Moore focused on the changed lives of African Americans in the aftermath of the Union victory (navy and army) at the Battle of Port Royal, South Carolina, in November 1861. 
With the departure of their owners, plantation workers in Union-controlled areas were no longer slaves but, before the Emancipation Proclamation, not yet free. Moore made this well-published view of field workers on Edisto Island, where the Third New Hampshire had guard duty from April 5 to June 1, 1862. The former slaves now worked for their own benefit and were heading off in their mule-driven wagons to tend their sweet potatoes and other crops; within a year President Lincoln would give them their freedom.
Date:1862 Medium: Albumen silver print from glass negative Dimensions: Image: 15.2 × 20.4 cm (6 × 8 1/16 in.) Classification: Photographs Credit Line: Gilman Collection, Museum Purchase, 2005 Accession Number: 2005.100.1137

Hopkinson’s Plantation, Edisto Island, South Carolina 1862

Henry P. Moore (American, 1833–1911)

In late fall 1861 or spring 1862, Henry P. Moore, a New Hampshire photographer, traveled from his home in Concord to make portraits of the Third New Hampshire Regiment in camp in Union-occupied coastal South Carolina. While in residence, he made some of the earliest and most poignant Civil War photographs of slave life in the Deep South. Moore focused on the changed lives of African Americans in the aftermath of the Union victory (navy and army) at the Battle of Port Royal, South Carolina, in November 1861.

With the departure of their owners, plantation workers in Union-controlled areas were no longer slaves but, before the Emancipation Proclamation, not yet free. Moore made this well-published view of field workers on Edisto Island, where the Third New Hampshire had guard duty from April 5 to June 1, 1862. The former slaves now worked for their own benefit and were heading off in their mule-driven wagons to tend their sweet potatoes and other crops; within a year President Lincoln would give them their freedom.

Date:1862 Medium: Albumen silver print from glass negative Dimensions: Image: 15.2 × 20.4 cm (6 × 8 1/16 in.) Classification: Photographs Credit Line: Gilman Collection, Museum Purchase, 2005 Accession Number: 2005.100.1137

A Rare Recording At The Library Of Congress- Julius Howell, Civil War Confederate General 
Recording of Julius Howell, -Recorded in Washington, DC. Premiered April 15, 2005, on Morning Edition.
—Julius Franklin Howell joined the Confederate Army when he was 16. After surviving a few battles, Howell eventually found himself in a Union prison camp at Point Lookout, Maryland. 
In 1947, at the age of 101, Howell made a rare recording at the Library of Congress, in which he described his enlistment, sudden capture, and his experience in the Union prison camp on the morning of April 15th, 1865, the morning Abraham Lincoln died. First photo age 19.
Listen to recording here: http://soundportraits.org/on-air/civil_war_general/
http://soundportraits.org/on-air/civil_war_general/howell_address.mp3

A Rare Recording At The Library Of Congress- Julius Howell, Civil War Confederate General 

Recording of Julius Howell, -Recorded in Washington, DC. Premiered April 15, 2005, on Morning Edition.

—Julius Franklin Howell joined the Confederate Army when he was 16. After surviving a few battles, Howell eventually found himself in a Union prison camp at Point Lookout, Maryland.

In 1947, at the age of 101, Howell made a rare recording at the Library of Congress, in which he described his enlistment, sudden capture, and his experience in the Union prison camp on the morning of April 15th, 1865, the morning Abraham Lincoln died. First photo age 19.

Listen to recording herehttp://soundportraits.org/on-air/civil_war_general/

http://soundportraits.org/on-air/civil_war_general/howell_address.mp3

On June 19, the New York Times reported that “about forty counties of Western Virginia, have, by a formal and unanimous vote, resolved to cut loose from the Old Dominion and form for themselves a new and independent State.”

Days later, President Lincoln officially recognized the “Reorganized” government as part of the Union. The delegates had not yet chosen a name for what would become the nation’s 35th state. Some liked “Allegheny,” others “Kanawha.” Today, of course, we know it by a name that still bears the scars of its severance: West Virginia.

Oh Abe, Look What You Started..Looking Like A Civil War Soldier Is All The Rage!

A great beard is a thing of beauty. But some people, especiallypathchy bearded hipsters in New York, are taking this “trend” to the next level — by getting beard transplants!

More and more New Yorkers are willing to pay a pretty penny for a big, beautiful beard, according to local plastic surgeons. Follicly-challenged hipsters from Williamsburg to Park Slope are dropping thousands of dollars on plastic surgery to boost their beard game and blend in with their neighbors. These facial hair transplants can cost from $3,000 for a fill-in of sections to $7,000 for a full beard. Apparently, many of them ask to look like George Clooney:

According to New York doctors, the procedure is growing in popularity. One Midtown plastic surgeon, Dr. Jeffrey Epstein, performs two to three beard implants a week, up from just a handful a decade ago.

The specific hipster-inspired style — a lumberjack-meets-roadie hybrid — was made popular in neighborhoods such as Williamsburg, Bushwick and Park Slope, doctors and patients said. During the procedure, doctors remove hair from other body parts, including the head and chest, before implanting it in the face. New beards grow back normally and can be shaved.

The hair-raising trend is also popular with Hasidic Jews, and guys who simply aren’t very hairy, doctors said. “It’s the style. It’s just more common now to see scruff than 10 years ago,” said Dr. Yael Halaas, a Midtown plastic surgeon who performs the procedure.

http://www.policymic.com/articles/83499/hipsters-getting-beard-transplants-are-officially-taking-things-too-far

http://nypost.com/2014/02/25/hipster-wannabes-forking-over-thousands-for-facial-hair-transplants/

"The Deserter’s Fate” - Graphic Photo Of Civil War Military Execution
Likely unpublished and rare, no backmark, captioned “The Deserters Fate” in symbolic red ink beneath dead soldier propped against a crude coffin. A disturbing photograph framing the corpse of a freshly executed boy-soldier in the foreground. Twenty paces distance from the unknown victim is the firing squad consisting of 14 armed men commanded by a sergeant — all appearing unfazed by the notoriety. The location is likewise unknown, but irregular patches of a lighter color amidst the bramble of dry grass suggest either melting snow or sand. The dead boy — displaying an illegible placard? — has been shot multiple times in the lower face, the blindfold removed and lying on the coffin revealing vacant eyes. Robert I. Alotta’s Civil War Justice-Union Army Executions under Lincoln (1989), cites 276 military executions during the Civil War, 186 by firing squad and 90 by hanging. Multiple desertion was the leading cause with 147 soldiers formally executed in the name of deterrence. This never-before-seen cdv bears some striking similarities to a pencil-and-chalk drawing of an early military execution that appeared in Harper’s Weekly on December 13, 1861. The scene in Virginia by artist Alfred Wordsworth Thompson captured the execution of Private William H. Johnston, Company D., 1st New York Cavalry who was illustrated wearing a light-colored shirt without military jacket. Johnston, who had been “singled out for very special treatment,” was the first Union soldier formally charged with desertion, and, as such, the court-martial proceeding received special attention from the Adjutant General and War Department. Alotta wrote that “(Johnston’s) trial and execution became a model for those that followed throughout the Civil War.” In blatant juxtaposition to Victorian sensibilities, the anonymous photographer recorded the grisly aftermath of the sentence in detail still repellant — the Deserter’s Fate.

"The Deserter’s Fate” - Graphic Photo Of Civil War Military Execution

Likely unpublished and rare, no backmark, captioned “The Deserters Fate” in symbolic red ink beneath dead soldier propped against a crude coffin. A disturbing photograph framing the corpse of a freshly executed boy-soldier in the foreground. Twenty paces distance from the unknown victim is the firing squad consisting of 14 armed men commanded by a sergeant — all appearing unfazed by the notoriety. The location is likewise unknown, but irregular patches of a lighter color amidst the bramble of dry grass suggest either melting snow or sand. The dead boy — displaying an illegible placard? — has been shot multiple times in the lower face, the blindfold removed and lying on the coffin revealing vacant eyes. 

Robert I. Alotta’s Civil War Justice-Union Army Executions under Lincoln (1989), cites 276 military executions during the Civil War, 186 by firing squad and 90 by hanging. Multiple desertion was the leading cause with 147 soldiers formally executed in the name of deterrence. 

This never-before-seen cdv bears some striking similarities to a pencil-and-chalk drawing of an early military execution that appeared in Harper’s Weekly on December 13, 1861. The scene in Virginia by artist Alfred Wordsworth Thompson captured the execution of Private William H. Johnston, Company D., 1st New York Cavalry who was illustrated wearing a light-colored shirt without military jacket. Johnston, who had been “singled out for very special treatment,” was the first Union soldier formally charged with desertion, and, as such, the court-martial proceeding received special attention from the Adjutant General and War Department. Alotta wrote that “(Johnston’s) trial and execution became a model for those that followed throughout the Civil War.” 

In blatant juxtaposition to Victorian sensibilities, the anonymous photographer recorded the grisly aftermath of the sentence in detail still repellant — the Deserter’s Fate.

Pennsylvania’s Land Of Lincolns
Dozens of relatives of the 16th president rest in an obscure Fayette County Cemetery, while the family maintains a mostly quiet Western Pennsylvania presence

Dozens, including the president’s great grandfather’s brother Mordecai, are buried in the tiny Lincoln family cemetery between Connellsville and Uniontown.
But these days, the local link is lost on most. Not even the Connellsville Area Historical Society seems to know anything about the Lincolns in their midst.
Ralph Lincoln thinks that’s sad. In his own quiet, and some might say quirky, ways, he aims to help keep this significant slice of local history alive.
The 49-year-old Mr. Lincoln says, “I’ve gotten more comments since I’ve grown the beard” — for the past two years — but as striking are his facial similarities and his rail-thin 5 foot 10 inch frame. “Abe was like, 6-3 … 6-4?” He grins. “I don’t meet his height but I meet his good looks.”
Read more: http://old.post-gazette.com/pg/06051/658231.stm#ixzz2up3aWigZ
http://old.post-gazette.com/pg/06051/658231.stm
Pennsylvania’s Land Of Lincolns
Dozens of relatives of the 16th president rest in an obscure Fayette County Cemetery, while the family maintains a mostly quiet Western Pennsylvania presence

Dozens, including the president’s great grandfather’s brother Mordecai, are buried in the tiny Lincoln family cemetery between Connellsville and Uniontown.

But these days, the local link is lost on most. Not even the Connellsville Area Historical Society seems to know anything about the Lincolns in their midst.

Ralph Lincoln thinks that’s sad. In his own quiet, and some might say quirky, ways, he aims to help keep this significant slice of local history alive.

The 49-year-old Mr. Lincoln says, “I’ve gotten more comments since I’ve grown the beard” — for the past two years — but as striking are his facial similarities and his rail-thin 5 foot 10 inch frame. “Abe was like, 6-3 … 6-4?” He grins. “I don’t meet his height but I meet his good looks.”

Read more: http://old.post-gazette.com/pg/06051/658231.stm#ixzz2up3aWigZ
http://old.post-gazette.com/pg/06051/658231.stm

Emilie Todd Helm (1836-1930) “Rebel In The White House”
When we see old photos in black and white, we sometimes forget that life back then was experienced in the same vibrant colors that surround us today.
 “The child has a tongue like the rest of the Todds.” —
Abraham Lincoln
Emilie Todd was Mary Todd Lincoln’s half-sister. In 1856 she married Benjamin Helm, a Confederate general. After Helm’s death in 1863 Emily Helm passed through Union Lines to visit her sister in the White House. This caused great consternation in the Northern newspapers. Emily Helm took an oath of loyalty to the Union and was granted amnesty.
As one of Robert Smith Todd’s younger daughters, Emilie was a beautiful debutante from a wealthy and influential Kentucky family when she married Ben Hardin Helm in 1856.  Widowed when General Helm, the last commander of the “Orphan Brigade,” fell at Chickamauga, Emilie and her daughter Katherine accepted the offer of Mary Todd and Abraham Lincoln to stay with them in Washington during the winter of 1863-64. 
While there, even though she kept a very low public profile, Emilie was labeled the “Rebel in the White House” with her presence causing the Lincolns some political discomfort.  Lincoln’s comment was made to a complaining General Daniel E. Sickles, after Sickles had baited Emilie by stating that the Confederate soldiers were“scoundrels [that] ran like scared rabbits” at Chattanooga.  Emily retorted that the Confederate soldiers had only “followed the example the Federals had set them at Bull Run and Manassas.”  Later in her life, Emilie was appointed postmistress of Elizabethtown, Kentucky, and became known as the “Mother of the Orphan Brigade” for her continued support to the survivors in the years after the Civil War.  Additionally, Emilie became an inveterate letter writer, genealogist, and raconteur, as evidenced by her collection of papers held in the Kentucky Historical Society. Source: Kentucky Historical Society Collections
Photo Colorized by Stacey Palmer @TheCivilWarParlor Tumblr.com

Emilie Todd Helm (1836-1930) “Rebel In The White House”

When we see old photos in black and white, we sometimes forget that life back then was experienced in the same vibrant colors that surround us today.

 “The child has a tongue like the rest of the Todds.” —

Abraham Lincoln

Emilie Todd was Mary Todd Lincoln’s half-sister. In 1856 she married Benjamin Helm, a Confederate general. After Helm’s death in 1863 Emily Helm passed through Union Lines to visit her sister in the White House. This caused great consternation in the Northern newspapers. Emily Helm took an oath of loyalty to the Union and was granted amnesty.

As one of Robert Smith Todd’s younger daughters, Emilie was a beautiful debutante from a wealthy and influential Kentucky family when she married Ben Hardin Helm in 1856.  Widowed when General Helm, the last commander of the “Orphan Brigade,” fell at Chickamauga, Emilie and her daughter Katherine accepted the offer of Mary Todd and Abraham Lincoln to stay with them in Washington during the winter of 1863-64. 

While there, even though she kept a very low public profile, Emilie was labeled the “Rebel in the White House” with her presence causing the Lincolns some political discomfort.  Lincoln’s comment was made to a complaining General Daniel E. Sickles, after Sickles had baited Emilie by stating that the Confederate soldiers were“scoundrels [that] ran like scared rabbits” at Chattanooga.  Emily retorted that the Confederate soldiers had only “followed the example the Federals had set them at Bull Run and Manassas.”  Later in her life, Emilie was appointed postmistress of Elizabethtown, Kentucky, and became known as the “Mother of the Orphan Brigade” for her continued support to the survivors in the years after the Civil War.  Additionally, Emilie became an inveterate letter writer, genealogist, and raconteur, as evidenced by her collection of papers held in the Kentucky Historical Society. Source: Kentucky Historical Society Collections

Photo Colorized by Stacey Palmer @TheCivilWarParlor Tumblr.com

MODERN SONGS ABOUT THE CIVIL WAR

Lincoln - The Civil Wars (Africanized) ft. Alex Boye

This song is inspired by author Tim Ballard’s book entitled “The COVENANT, LINCOLN and the WAR.”

Alex Boye who sings, was deeply touched and inspired by Tim (Who plays the Union Captain in the music video). This amazing song about Lincoln was written by a very talented soul by the name of Todd. D Reynolds (Who also plays the confederate Captain in the video), with a later adaptation by Alex Boye. The chorus is sung in Yoruba (West African dialect) representing the cry of the African slaves, on the ships heading to America, and the verses are sung in English as told from the mouth of Lincoln who is praying desperately to his God for strength to follow through in his decision to fight for the freedom of blacks despite the possibility of death threats to his life and losing all his friends and peers. May we all be able to find in life something we are passionate about and stand up and defend it. Even if we stand alone. -Alex Boye

LYRICS FOR “LINCOLN”

WHY IS IT ME THAT MUST, SUFFER THE PLEA?
FOR I ALONE, CANNOT SET THEM FREE
BUT CAN I FULFILL, GODS OWN WILL
EVEN IF MY PEOPLE, TURN ON ME
WHY MUST HE ASK THIS OF ME, EVERYTHING?
JUST TO HEAR FREEDOM RING
JUST TO SEE A FLAG UNFURLED
JUST TO HEAR FREEDOM RING

ERU OLORUN BA MI

CO SENI TO LE DA DURO

NOW IS THE HOUR I QUESTION HIS POWER
CAN HE MAKE THESE MEN, UNDERSTAND?
THAT ALL OF OUR TEARS, AND THESE HEART WRENCHING YEARS
WAS THE PRICE WE PAID, FOR MAN

WHY MUST HE ASK THIS OF ME, EVERYTHING?
JUST TO HEAR FREEDOM RING?
JUST TO SEE THAT FLAG UNFURLED YEAH
JUST TO HEAR FREEDOM RING

NOW WITH THIS BOOK IN MY HANDS, I CAN SEE

EVERYTHING

- See more at: http://alexboye.com/external-videos/lincoln-the-civil-wars-africanized-ft-alex-boye/#sthash.7iCF2WY2.dpuf

http://www.amazon.com/The-Covenant-Lincoln-Timothy-Ballard-ebook/dp/B009QFNLNI

"The Second Minnesota Regiment at Missionary Ridge, Novemeber 25th 1863 by Douglas Volk, hangs in the governpr’s reception room at the Minnesota Capitol, Minnesota Historical Society"
Douglas Volk, named Stephen Arnold Douglas Volk was an American portrait and landscape painter. He helped establish the Minneapolis School of Fine Arts.
Having a lifelong interest in Abraham Lincoln (who, as President-elect, had sat for Volk’s sculptor father), Volk also painted several portraits of the President, one of which now adorns the Lincoln bedroom at the White House; another, now at the National Gallery in Washington, D.C., was used as model for the three-cent Lincoln postage stamp issued in the 1950s.
 

"The Second Minnesota Regiment at Missionary Ridge, Novemeber 25th 1863 by Douglas Volk, hangs in the governpr’s reception room at the Minnesota Capitol, Minnesota Historical Society"

Douglas Volk, named Stephen Arnold Douglas Volk was an American portrait and landscape painter. He helped establish the Minneapolis School of Fine Arts.

Having a lifelong interest in Abraham Lincoln (who, as President-elect, had sat for Volk’s sculptor father), Volk also painted several portraits of the President, one of which now adorns the Lincoln bedroom at the White House; another, now at the National Gallery in Washington, D.C., was used as model for the three-cent Lincoln postage stamp issued in the 1950s.

 

Lincoln Would Be Amused..President’s Day-The Third Monday In February

Historical US Presidents George Washington And Abraham Lincoln At The Honda Dealers

Presidents’ Day is an American holiday celebrated on the third Monday in February. Originally established in 1885 in recognition of President George Washington, it is still officially called “Washington’s Birthday” by the federal government. While several states still have individual holidays honoring the birthdays of Washington, Abraham Lincoln and other figures, Presidents’ Day is now popularly viewed as a day to celebrate all U.S. presidents past and present.

Washington and Lincoln still remain the two most recognized leaders, but Presidents’ Day is now popularly seen as a day to recognize the lives and achievements of all of America’s chief executives. Some lawmakers have objected to this view, arguing that grouping George Washington and Abraham Lincoln together with less successful presidents minimizes their legacies. Congressional measures to restore Washington and Lincoln’s individual birthdays were proposed during the early 2000s, but all failed to gain much attention. For its part, the federal government has held fast to the original incarnation of the holiday as a celebration of the country’s first president. The third Monday in February is still listed on official calendars as Washington’s Birthday.

http://www.history.com/topics/holidays/presidents-day

Facebook - Morbid History - Humor And Learning
"When you start talking about something gruesome, you can get people who otherwise don’t care to pay attention,". "It’s the details that make you shudder that also make you laugh." ~ Megan Wolff, a doctoral student in the history of public health
Twenty-six-year-old Booth was one of the most famous actors in the country when he shot Lincoln during a performance at Ford’s Theater in Washington D.C on the night of April 14. Booth was a Maryland native and a strong supporter of the Confederacy. As the war entered its final stages, Booth hatched a conspiracy to kidnap the president. He enlisted the aid of several associates, but the opportunity never presented itself. After the surrender of Robert E. Lees Confederate army at Appomattox Court House Virginia, on April 9, Booth changed the plan to a simultaneous assassination of Lincoln, Vice President Andrew Johnson and Secretary of State William Seward. Only Lincoln was actually killed, however. Seward was stabbed by Lewis Paine but survived, while the man assigned to kill Johnson did not carry out his assignment.

Facebook - Morbid History - Humor And Learning

"When you start talking about something gruesome, you can get people who otherwise don’t care to pay attention,". "It’s the details that make you shudder that also make you laugh." ~ Megan Wolff, a doctoral student in the history of public health

Twenty-six-year-old Booth was one of the most famous actors in the country when he shot Lincoln during a performance at Ford’s Theater in Washington D.C on the night of April 14. Booth was a Maryland native and a strong supporter of the Confederacy. As the war entered its final stages, Booth hatched a conspiracy to kidnap the president. He enlisted the aid of several associates, but the opportunity never presented itself. After the surrender of Robert E. Lees Confederate army at Appomattox Court House Virginia, on April 9, Booth changed the plan to a simultaneous assassination of Lincoln, Vice President Andrew Johnson and Secretary of State William Seward. Only Lincoln was actually killed, however. Seward was stabbed by Lewis Paine but survived, while the man assigned to kill Johnson did not carry out his assignment.

"The Way To A Man’s Heart Is Through His Stomach"
Mary Todd Lincoln cake is “courtin’ cake” — the very cake that the future first lady served in the mid-1800s to win over Abe Lincoln. 
She served the cake to Lincoln as he came courting, and it was his favorite. 
The story is told that Mary Todd’s aristocratic family was introduced to the cake when a French dignitary came to visit their Lexington, Ky., home and brought his own chef. The Todd family requested the recipe, and later Mary Todd took the recipe along when she moved to Springfield in 1839.
Some say the first lady continued to bake the cake when the Lincolns lived in the White House from 1861 to 1865, but White House chefs found it too plain for important guests. They made it into a layered cake with rich vanilla frosting instead of the traditional powdered sugar topping.
Mary Todd Lincoln Cake
1 1/2 cups sugar. 1 cup butter. 1 teaspoon. vanilla 2 1/4. cups cake flour. 1 tablespoon baking powder. 1 1/3 cups milk. 1 cup almonds, finely chopped. 6 egg whites, stiffly beaten. White Frosting. 1 cup sugar. 1/3 cup water. 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar. 1 dash salt. 2 egg whites. 1 teaspoon vanilla.Directions:1 Cake:.2 Cream sugar, butter and vanilla.3 Sift together cake flour and baking powder three times.4 Add to creamed mixture alternatively with milk.5 Stir in almonds.6 Gently fold in the egg whites.7 Pour into two greased and floured 9 x 1 1/2 inch round baking pans.8 Bake at 375 degrees for 30 minutes.9 Cool for 10 minutes before removing from pan.10 White Frosting:.11 Bring to boiling, sugar, water, cream of tartar and salt. Boil until sugar dissolves.12 Put egg whites in mixing bowl. Start beater and while egg whites are beating, very slowly add hot syrup.13 Beat until stiff peaks form, about 7 minutes.14 Beat in vanilla for one more minute.
Read more: <a href=”http://baking.food.com/recipe/mary-todd-lincoln-cake-355995?oc=linkback”>http://baking.food.com/recipe/mary-todd-lincoln-cake-355995?oc=linkback</a>
http://www.trbimg.com/img-52f44b35/turbine/ct-talk-aj-1-lincoln-cake-0207-tif-20140206/2048/2048x1365

"The Way To A Man’s Heart Is Through His Stomach"

Mary Todd Lincoln cake is “courtin’ cake” — the very cake that the future first lady served in the mid-1800s to win over Abe Lincoln. 

She served the cake to Lincoln as he came courting, and it was his favorite. 

The story is told that Mary Todd’s aristocratic family was introduced to the cake when a French dignitary came to visit their Lexington, Ky., home and brought his own chef. The Todd family requested the recipe, and later Mary Todd took the recipe along when she moved to Springfield in 1839.

Some say the first lady continued to bake the cake when the Lincolns lived in the White House from 1861 to 1865, but White House chefs found it too plain for important guests. They made it into a layered cake with rich vanilla frosting instead of the traditional powdered sugar topping.

Mary Todd Lincoln Cake

1 1/2 cups sugar. 1 cup butter. 1 teaspoon. vanilla 2 1/4. cups cake flour. 1 tablespoon baking powder. 1 1/3 cups milk. 1 cup almonds, finely chopped. 6 egg whites, stiffly beaten. White Frosting. 1 cup sugar. 1/3 cup water. 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar. 1 dash salt. 2 egg whites. 1 teaspoon vanilla.
Directions:
Cake:.
Cream sugar, butter and vanilla.
Sift together cake flour and baking powder three times.
Add to creamed mixture alternatively with milk.
Stir in almonds.
Gently fold in the egg whites.
Pour into two greased and floured 9 x 1 1/2 inch round baking pans.
Bake at 375 degrees for 30 minutes.
Cool for 10 minutes before removing from pan.
10 White Frosting:.
11 Bring to boiling, sugar, water, cream of tartar and salt. Boil until sugar dissolves.12 Put egg whites in mixing bowl. Start beater and while egg whites are beating, very slowly add hot syrup.13 Beat until stiff peaks form, about 7 minutes.14 Beat in vanilla for one more minute.

Read more: <a href=”http://baking.food.com/recipe/mary-todd-lincoln-cake-355995?oc=linkback”>http://baking.food.com/recipe/mary-todd-lincoln-cake-355995?oc=linkback</a>

http://www.trbimg.com/img-52f44b35/turbine/ct-talk-aj-1-lincoln-cake-0207-tif-20140206/2048/2048x1365