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Exclusive - Andrew Napolitano Extended Interview Pt. 2

Pennsylvania’s Land Of Lincolns
Dozens of relatives of the 16th president rest in an obscure Fayette County Cemetery, while the family maintains a mostly quiet Western Pennsylvania presence

Dozens, including the president’s great grandfather’s brother Mordecai, are buried in the tiny Lincoln family cemetery between Connellsville and Uniontown.

But these days, the local link is lost on most. Not even the Connellsville Area Historical Society seems to know anything about the Lincolns in their midst.

Ralph Lincoln thinks that’s sad. In his own quiet, and some might say quirky, ways, he aims to help keep this significant slice of local history alive.

The 49-year-old Mr. Lincoln says, “I’ve gotten more comments since I’ve grown the beard” — for the past two years — but as striking are his facial similarities and his rail-thin 5 foot 10 inch frame. “Abe was like, 6-3 … 6-4?” He grins. “I don’t meet his height but I meet his good looks.”

Read more: http://old.post-gazette.com/pg/06051/658231.stm#ixzz2up3aWigZ
http://old.post-gazette.com/pg/06051/658231.stm

Emilie Todd Helm (1836-1930) “Rebel In The White House”

When we see old photos in black and white, we sometimes forget that life back then was experienced in the same vibrant colors that surround us today.

 “The child has a tongue like the rest of the Todds.” —

Abraham Lincoln

Emilie Todd was Mary Todd Lincoln’s half-sister. In 1856 she married Benjamin Helm, a Confederate general. After Helm’s death in 1863 Emily Helm passed through Union Lines to visit her sister in the White House. This caused great consternation in the Northern newspapers. Emily Helm took an oath of loyalty to the Union and was granted amnesty.

As one of Robert Smith Todd’s younger daughters, Emilie was a beautiful debutante from a wealthy and influential Kentucky family when she married Ben Hardin Helm in 1856.  Widowed when General Helm, the last commander of the “Orphan Brigade,” fell at Chickamauga, Emilie and her daughter Katherine accepted the offer of Mary Todd and Abraham Lincoln to stay with them in Washington during the winter of 1863-64. 

While there, even though she kept a very low public profile, Emilie was labeled the “Rebel in the White House” with her presence causing the Lincolns some political discomfort.  Lincoln’s comment was made to a complaining General Daniel E. Sickles, after Sickles had baited Emilie by stating that the Confederate soldiers were“scoundrels [that] ran like scared rabbits” at Chattanooga.  Emily retorted that the Confederate soldiers had only “followed the example the Federals had set them at Bull Run and Manassas.”  Later in her life, Emilie was appointed postmistress of Elizabethtown, Kentucky, and became known as the “Mother of the Orphan Brigade” for her continued support to the survivors in the years after the Civil War.  Additionally, Emilie became an inveterate letter writer, genealogist, and raconteur, as evidenced by her collection of papers held in the Kentucky Historical Society. Source: Kentucky Historical Society Collections

Photo Colorized by Stacey Palmer @TheCivilWarParlor Tumblr.com

MODERN SONGS ABOUT THE CIVIL WAR

Lincoln - The Civil Wars (Africanized) ft. Alex Boye

This song is inspired by author Tim Ballard’s book entitled “The COVENANT, LINCOLN and the WAR.”

Alex Boye who sings, was deeply touched and inspired by Tim (Who plays the Union Captain in the music video). This amazing song about Lincoln was written by a very talented soul by the name of Todd. D Reynolds (Who also plays the confederate Captain in the video), with a later adaptation by Alex Boye. The chorus is sung in Yoruba (West African dialect) representing the cry of the African slaves, on the ships heading to America, and the verses are sung in English as told from the mouth of Lincoln who is praying desperately to his God for strength to follow through in his decision to fight for the freedom of blacks despite the possibility of death threats to his life and losing all his friends and peers. May we all be able to find in life something we are passionate about and stand up and defend it. Even if we stand alone. -Alex Boye

LYRICS FOR “LINCOLN”

WHY IS IT ME THAT MUST, SUFFER THE PLEA?
FOR I ALONE, CANNOT SET THEM FREE
BUT CAN I FULFILL, GODS OWN WILL
EVEN IF MY PEOPLE, TURN ON ME
WHY MUST HE ASK THIS OF ME, EVERYTHING?
JUST TO HEAR FREEDOM RING
JUST TO SEE A FLAG UNFURLED
JUST TO HEAR FREEDOM RING

ERU OLORUN BA MI

CO SENI TO LE DA DURO

NOW IS THE HOUR I QUESTION HIS POWER
CAN HE MAKE THESE MEN, UNDERSTAND?
THAT ALL OF OUR TEARS, AND THESE HEART WRENCHING YEARS
WAS THE PRICE WE PAID, FOR MAN

WHY MUST HE ASK THIS OF ME, EVERYTHING?
JUST TO HEAR FREEDOM RING?
JUST TO SEE THAT FLAG UNFURLED YEAH
JUST TO HEAR FREEDOM RING

NOW WITH THIS BOOK IN MY HANDS, I CAN SEE

EVERYTHING

- See more at: http://alexboye.com/external-videos/lincoln-the-civil-wars-africanized-ft-alex-boye/#sthash.7iCF2WY2.dpuf

http://www.amazon.com/The-Covenant-Lincoln-Timothy-Ballard-ebook/dp/B009QFNLNI

Lincoln Would Be Amused..President’s Day-The Third Monday In February

Historical US Presidents George Washington And Abraham Lincoln At The Honda Dealers

Presidents’ Day is an American holiday celebrated on the third Monday in February. Originally established in 1885 in recognition of President George Washington, it is still officially called “Washington’s Birthday” by the federal government. While several states still have individual holidays honoring the birthdays of Washington, Abraham Lincoln and other figures, Presidents’ Day is now popularly viewed as a day to celebrate all U.S. presidents past and present.

Washington and Lincoln still remain the two most recognized leaders, but Presidents’ Day is now popularly seen as a day to recognize the lives and achievements of all of America’s chief executives. Some lawmakers have objected to this view, arguing that grouping George Washington and Abraham Lincoln together with less successful presidents minimizes their legacies. Congressional measures to restore Washington and Lincoln’s individual birthdays were proposed during the early 2000s, but all failed to gain much attention. For its part, the federal government has held fast to the original incarnation of the holiday as a celebration of the country’s first president. The third Monday in February is still listed on official calendars as Washington’s Birthday.

http://www.history.com/topics/holidays/presidents-day

Facebook - Morbid History - Humor And Learning

"When you start talking about something gruesome, you can get people who otherwise don’t care to pay attention,". "It’s the details that make you shudder that also make you laugh." ~ Megan Wolff, a doctoral student in the history of public health

Twenty-six-year-old Booth was one of the most famous actors in the country when he shot Lincoln during a performance at Ford’s Theater in Washington D.C on the night of April 14. Booth was a Maryland native and a strong supporter of the Confederacy. As the war entered its final stages, Booth hatched a conspiracy to kidnap the president. He enlisted the aid of several associates, but the opportunity never presented itself. After the surrender of Robert E. Lees Confederate army at Appomattox Court House Virginia, on April 9, Booth changed the plan to a simultaneous assassination of Lincoln, Vice President Andrew Johnson and Secretary of State William Seward. Only Lincoln was actually killed, however. Seward was stabbed by Lewis Paine but survived, while the man assigned to kill Johnson did not carry out his assignment.

"

“Those who deny freedom to others, deserve it not for themselves.”

– Abraham Lincoln

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http://www.biography.com/people/abraham-lincoln-9382540

Happy Birthday Mr President! 

Lincoln’s Birthday is observed in the United States in honor of Abraham Lincoln, who was the nation’s 16th president and was known as the Great Emancipator.

One of the most popular presidents in United States history. It is a state holiday in some states on or around February 12 each year.

Abraham Lincoln was born in Hardin County, Kentucky, on February 12 in 1809. He lived for a time in Indiana before moving to Illinois. He worked on a farm, split rails for fences, worked in a store, was a captain in the Black Hawk War.

He ended slavery, won the Civil War, and ensured that the US would remain united in the modern world. His face is printed on the five-dollar bill and stamped on the penny. The Lincoln Memorial is one of the nation’s iconic sites. But Lincoln’s Birthday on Feb. 12 is not a national holiday, and it never has been. Nor is Lincoln officially remembered on a federal President’s Day in late February. That’s just not the case, despite a widespread belief to the contrary.

Lincoln’s Birthday is a public holiday in the following states on February 12:

  • Connecticut.
  • Illinois.
  • Missouri.
  • New Jersey.
  • New York (Lincoln’s Birthday is a floating holiday for state government employees in certain bargaining units).

Many government offices, schools and businesses are closed within most these states (see status for New York, above) on this day. Lincoln’s Birthday is also absorbed into Presidents’ Day in other parts of the United States, such as Arizona, Maryland, Michigan, Ohio, and West Virginia.

http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/DC-Decoder/Decoder-Buzz/2012/0212/Why-Abraham-Lincoln-s-birthday-isn-t-a-federal-holiday

http://www.timeanddate.com/holidays/us/lincolns-birthday

Jewish Women In The Civil War~ Septima Maria Levy Collis-

Describing Mr Lincoln~

Septima Maria Levy Collis was born in 1842 and grew up in Charleston, which had the largest Jewish population in the South. Although Septima Maria Levy had Southern roots, she became a “Union woman” after she married Charles Collis, a non-Jewish immigrant from Ireland. He was a Union officer whose rank gradually escalated to major general from sergeant major. The couple lived in Philadelphia.

In her memoirs, “A Woman’s War Record 1861–1865,” published in 1889, Collis’s description of Lincoln is endearing, from his pleasure at her briefly diverting him from the stress of his presidency — he confided that he was worried about his soldiers — to his ill-fitting clothes and his gentle manner. In her memoirs, Collis writes about the fondness she felt for Lincoln and about how she grieved over his assassination.

“I had learned to love Mr. Lincoln,” she wrote. “I had seen him weep, had heard him laugh, had been gladdened by his wit and saddened by his pathos.”

When Charles Collis contracted pneumonia, his wife perilously traveled through war-torn Alexandria, Va., via cattle train and wagon, to get to her husband’s camp. There, she nursed him back to health…She died in 1917.

Read more: http://forward.com/articles/157374/the-ladies-in-grey-and-blue/?p=all#ixzz2srK0abDs

Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.- 

One of the most influential American common law judges, honored during his lifetime in Great Britain as well as the United States. Holmes retired from the Court at the age of 90 years, 309 days, making him the oldest Justice in the Supreme Court’s history.

During his senior year of college, at the outset of the Civil War, Holmes enlisted in the fourth battalion, Massachusetts militia, and then received a commission as first lieutenant in the Twentieth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.  He saw much action, from the Peninsula Campaign to the Wilderness, suffering wounds at the Battle of Ball’s Bluff, Antietam, and, Chancellorsville and suffered from a near-fatal case of dysentery. Holmes particularly admired and was close to his fellow officer in the 20th Mass., Henry Livermore Abbott.

Holmes rose to the rank of lieutenant colonel, but eschewed promotion in his regiment and served on the staff of the Vi Corp during the Wilderness campaign. Abbott took command of the regiment in his place, and was killed. Holmes is said to have shouted at Lincoln to take cover during the Battle Of Fort Stevens, although this is commonly regarded as apocryphal. Although Holmes himself made this claim, he likely was not present on the day Lincoln visited Fort Stevens. Holmes received a brevet (honorary) promotion to colonel in recognition of his services during the war. He retired to his home in Boston after his three-year enlistment ended in 1864, weary and ill, his regiment disbanded.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oliver_Wendell_Holmes,_Jr.

Utah In The Civil War-Once the Civil War started, President Abraham Lincoln was concerned about preserving telegraph lines and the Overland Trail stagecoach and mail line in the West.

In the spring of 1862, Lincoln wired Utah leader Brigham Young and asked for volunteer soldiers to protect these paths of communication. As a result, a volunteer unit of the Nauvoo Legion led by Lot Smith — a Farmington livestock owner — was assigned to safeguard the trail and telegraph lines for 90 days.

There was irony in Smith’s assignment to work for the federal government, because a few years earlier, when Army troops were sent to Utah to suppress the alleged Mormon uprising, Smith was ordered by Brigham Young to thwart those soldiers’ entry into the state. Utah did boast a contingent of Civil War soldiers once the 3rd California Volunteer Infantry arrived in Salt Lake City in 1862.

Although some companies that belonged to this Union regiment served in California, others were dispatched to Utah territory to replace Lot Smith’s unit. The army first looked at moving into the site of the abandoned Camp Floyd, but decided instead to locate on the foothills overlooking the Salt Lake Valley. Led by Colonel Patrick Edward Connor, the army’s mission was to protect mail and shipping routes during the war. Gold that was being mined and shipped out of California at the time was important for helping to finance the Union cause. Also, some Californians were sympathetic to the South so Lincoln viewed mail and telegraph lines as vital to keeping communication open with the West. 

http://www.standard.net/topics/features/2011/06/05/civil-war-was-felt-utah-too

California Company of Soldiers Organized in Hayward, ca. 1861

"I have long desired to see California; the production of her gold mines has been a marvel to me, and her stand for the Union, her generous offerings to the Sanitary (Commission), and her loyal representatives have endeared your people to me; and nothing would give me more pleasure than a visit to the Pacific shore, and to say in person to your citizens, ‘God bless you for your devotion to the Union,’ but the unknown is before us. I may say, however, that I have it now in purpose when the railroad is finished, to visit your wonderful state." ~Abraham Lincoln, speaking to his friend Charles Maltby, Superintendent of Indian Affairs for California, on March 25, 1865.

CALIFORNIA IN THE CIVIL WAR?

You may not think of California when you think of the Civil War, but the war deeply divided Californians as it did the rest of the country. Secessionists dominated the Southern half of the state, while Northern California remained predominately pro-Union.  Even before the war began,California played an important role in the fight over slavery, as events here helped to set the stage for war.  

Like other Northern states, California supplied thousands of soldiers for the Union war effort; California troops were responsible for pushing the Confederate Army out of Arizona and New Mexico in 1862.  Additionally, numerous California regiments were organized and joined with state regiments back east.  Californians would face the enemy in most of the major battles in the East, including one regiment, organized and commanded by the former California Senator Edward Dickinson Baker (then a Colonel), that defended against Pickett’s charge at Gettysburg, arguably the most pivotal military action of the war.  In all, over 17,000 Californians would join as soldiers; this is the highest per-capita total for any state in the Union.

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=26775

The Minutemen Of ‘61

The 6th Massachusetts assaulted in Baltimore, April 19, 1861

Governor Andrew took office in January 1861, just two weeks after the secession of South Carolina. Convinced that war was imminent, Andrew took rapid measures to prepare the state militia for active duty. On April 15, 1861, Andrew received a telegraph from Washington calling for 1,500 men from Massachusetts to serve for ninety days. The next day, several companies of the 8th Massachusetts Volunteer Militia from Marbelhead Massachusetts were the first to report in Boston; by the end of the day, three regiments were ready to start for Washington.

While passing through Baltimore on April 19, 1861, the 6th Massachusetts was attacked by a pro-secession mob and became the first volunteer troops to suffer casualties in the war. The 6th Massachusetts was also the first volunteer regiment to reach Washington, D.C. in response to Lincoln’s call for troops. Lincoln awaited the arrival of additional regiments, but none arrived for several days. Inspecting the 6th Massachusetts on April 24, Lincoln told the soldiers, “I don’t believe there is any North…You are the only Northern realities.”

Given that the 6th Massachusetts reached Washington on April 19 (the anniversary of the Battles of Lexington and Concord, which commenced the American Revolution) and other Massachusetts regiments were en route to Washington and Virginia on that date, the first militia units to leave Massachusetts were dubbed, “The Minutemen of ’61.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massachusetts_in_the_American_Civil_War

Lincoln Daguerreotype 1854

A ninth-plate copy tintype of the lost Polycarpus Von Schneidau daguerreotype of Lincoln, taken in Chicago in 1854, was listed on eBay with a Buy-It-Now price of $22,000. 

Source: The Rail Splitter