The Civil War Parlor

”The dead continue to live by way of the resurrection we give them in telling their stories” -Stories of Real Human Beings Make History Powerful, Photographs Make it Immediate. A Blog Remembering the Men and Women of the American Civil War, North & South, people, faces, and a unique culture we will never see again. Photos and stories about the people that lived it, including African American Photographs, pre civil war photos and the period in cultural history that began just after the civil war. The historical info, photos and documents in this blog reflect the attitudes, perspectives, and beliefs of different times. This blog does not endorse the views expressed in some posts, which may contain materials offensive to some readers, you cannot compare the beliefs and ethical values of the people of the 1800's to the standards of today. Every effort is taken to remember the men and women of the Union and Confederacy equally with dignity and respect. The events of the war, and the men of the war, are fast fading from the public attention. Its history is growing to be an “Old, Old Story.” Public interest is weakening day by day. The memory of march, and camp, and battle-field, of the long and manly endurance, of the superb and uncomplaining courage, of the mass of sacrifice that redeemed the Nation, is fast dying out. Those who rejoice in the liberty and peace secured by the soldier’s suffering and privation, accept the benefits, but deny or forget the benefactor-1877 National Tribune.

California’s Secessionist Impulse
Independence Day in 1861 was a day which American citizens fervently showed their support for either the Union and Confederate cause.  This Confederate flag, owned by a Major J.P. Gillis, was breifly waved through the streets of Sacramento until another citizen, Jack Biderman, wrestled Gillis to the ground and took the flag from him.  
While this brief episode represents the only confirmed Confederate flag display in the Northern part of the state, a similar flag to this one was raised in the plaza of Los Angeles on the same day; it would remain there for over a month.   
Following the Gold Rush California was settled primarily by Midwestern and Southern and farmers, miners and businessmen. Democrats dominated the state from its foundation. Southern Democrats sympathetic to secession, although a minority in the state, were a majority in Southern California and Tulare County and were in large numbers in San Joaquin, Santa Clara, Monterey California was home for powerful businessmen who played a significant role in Californian politics through their control of mines, shipping, finance, and the Republican party but were a minority party until the secession crisis.
Source: http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=26834 Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_in_the_American_Civil_War

California’s Secessionist Impulse

Independence Day in 1861 was a day which American citizens fervently showed their support for either the Union and Confederate cause.  This Confederate flag, owned by a Major J.P. Gillis, was breifly waved through the streets of Sacramento until another citizen, Jack Biderman, wrestled Gillis to the ground and took the flag from him.  

While this brief episode represents the only confirmed Confederate flag display in the Northern part of the state, a similar flag to this one was raised in the plaza of Los Angeles on the same day; it would remain there for over a month.   

Following the Gold Rush California was settled primarily by Midwestern and Southern and farmers, miners and businessmen. Democrats dominated the state from its foundation. Southern Democrats sympathetic to secession, although a minority in the state, were a majority in Southern California and Tulare County and were in large numbers in San Joaquin, Santa Clara, Monterey California was home for powerful businessmen who played a significant role in Californian politics through their control of mines, shipping, finance, and the Republican party but were a minority party until the secession crisis.

Source: http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=26834 Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_in_the_American_Civil_War

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