The Civil War Parlor

”The dead continue to live by way of the resurrection we give them in telling their stories” -Stories of Real Human Beings Make History Powerful, Photographs Make it Immediate. A Blog Remembering the Men and Women of the American Civil War, North & South, people, faces, and a unique culture we will never see again. Photos and stories about the people that lived it, including African American Photographs, pre civil war photos and the period in cultural history that began just after the civil war. The historical info, photos and documents in this blog reflect the attitudes, perspectives, and beliefs of different times. This blog does not endorse the views expressed in some posts, which may contain materials offensive to some readers, you cannot compare the beliefs and ethical values of the people of the 1800's to the standards of today. Every effort is taken to remember the men and women of the Union and Confederacy equally with dignity and respect. The events of the war, and the men of the war, are fast fading from the public attention. Its history is growing to be an “Old, Old Story.” Public interest is weakening day by day. The memory of march, and camp, and battle-field, of the long and manly endurance, of the superb and uncomplaining courage, of the mass of sacrifice that redeemed the Nation, is fast dying out. Those who rejoice in the liberty and peace secured by the soldier’s suffering and privation, accept the benefits, but deny or forget the benefactor-1877 National Tribune.

W.E.B. DuBois
1868-1963
Source: Address at the New York City Republican Club (March 5, 1910)
William Edward Burghardt (W.E.B.) DuBois studied at Fisk University, and then Harvard University, where he became the first African American to earn a doctorate. He published his seminal work,The Souls of Black Folk, in 1903, a collection of essays that touch on a wide range of topics including equal rights, stereotypes, and critiques of black leadership at the time. Along with William Monroe Trotter, DuBois led The Niagara Movement, an early black civil rights organization DuBois helped found in 1905. He was highly critical of the Atlanta Compromise, an 1895 agreement between African-American leaders and Southern white leaders that stated Southern blacks would not challenge current white political rule in exchange for basic access to education and due process in law. In 1909, DuBois co-founded the still active National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), an organization dedicated to ensuring “the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate racial hatred and racial discrimination.”
This collection of original posters created for The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross PBS series features quotations by famous African Americans, including leaders, intellectuals and cultural figures such as Harriet Tubman, W.E.B. DuBois, Zora Neale Hurston, Jackie Robinson, Malcolm X, President Barack Obama, and more. All the posters can be downloaded, printed and shared.
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/african-americans-many-rivers-to-cross/african-american-quotation-posters/

W.E.B. DuBois

1868-1963
Source: Address at the New York City Republican Club (March 5, 1910)

William Edward Burghardt (W.E.B.) DuBois studied at Fisk University, and then Harvard University, where he became the first African American to earn a doctorate. He published his seminal work,The Souls of Black Folk, in 1903, a collection of essays that touch on a wide range of topics including equal rights, stereotypes, and critiques of black leadership at the time. Along with William Monroe Trotter, DuBois led The Niagara Movement, an early black civil rights organization DuBois helped found in 1905. He was highly critical of the Atlanta Compromise, an 1895 agreement between African-American leaders and Southern white leaders that stated Southern blacks would not challenge current white political rule in exchange for basic access to education and due process in law. In 1909, DuBois co-founded the still active National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), an organization dedicated to ensuring “the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate racial hatred and racial discrimination.”

This collection of original posters created for The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross PBS series features quotations by famous African Americans, including leaders, intellectuals and cultural figures such as Harriet Tubman, W.E.B. DuBois, Zora Neale Hurston, Jackie Robinson, Malcolm X, President Barack Obama, and more. All the posters can be downloaded, printed and shared.

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/african-americans-many-rivers-to-cross/african-american-quotation-posters/

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