The Civil War Parlor

”The dead continue to live by way of the resurrection we give them in telling their stories” -Stories of Real Human Beings Make History Powerful, Photographs Make it Immediate. A Blog Remembering the Men and Women of the American Civil War, North & South, people, faces, and a unique culture we will never see again. Photos and stories about the people that lived it, including African American Photographs, pre civil war photos and the period in cultural history that began just after the civil war. The historical info, photos and documents in this blog reflect the attitudes, perspectives, and beliefs of different times. This blog does not endorse the views expressed in some posts, which may contain materials offensive to some readers, you cannot compare the beliefs and ethical values of the people of the 1800's to the standards of today. Every effort is taken to remember the men and women of the Union and Confederacy equally with dignity and respect. The events of the war, and the men of the war, are fast fading from the public attention. Its history is growing to be an “Old, Old Story.” Public interest is weakening day by day. The memory of march, and camp, and battle-field, of the long and manly endurance, of the superb and uncomplaining courage, of the mass of sacrifice that redeemed the Nation, is fast dying out. Those who rejoice in the liberty and peace secured by the soldier’s suffering and privation, accept the benefits, but deny or forget the benefactor-1877 National Tribune.

Quanah Parker c. 1852–1911-
E. W. Hamilton (lifedates unknown) Collodion print, c. 1890
Opposed to the increasing wave of American settlement on Comanche lands, Quanah Parker emerged as one of the leaders of the Red River War, which was fought on the southern plains in 1874–75. For him the historic encounter between non-Natives and the Comanche shaped many elements of his life. His mother was a white woman who had been captured as a child. His father—an important tribal chief—fought the U.S. military on repeated occasions.
Following the surrender of the Comanche to federal authorities in 1875, Parker decided to accept a new life. In time he became a prosperous farmer and rancher with property of more than forty thousand acres.
He was also politically active, rising to become the principal chief of the Comanche and often serving in a diplomatic role with U.S. officials. Yet his decision to wear his hair in braids, to practice polygamy, and to use peyote in ceremonies suggested his continuing desire for an independent life.
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

Quanah Parker c. 1852–1911-

E. W. Hamilton (lifedates unknown) 
Collodion print, c. 1890

Opposed to the increasing wave of American settlement on Comanche lands, Quanah Parker emerged as one of the leaders of the Red River War, which was fought on the southern plains in 1874–75. For him the historic encounter between non-Natives and the Comanche shaped many elements of his life. His mother was a white woman who had been captured as a child. His father—an important tribal chief—fought the U.S. military on repeated occasions.

Following the surrender of the Comanche to federal authorities in 1875, Parker decided to accept a new life. In time he became a prosperous farmer and rancher with property of more than forty thousand acres.

He was also politically active, rising to become the principal chief of the Comanche and often serving in a diplomatic role with U.S. officials. Yet his decision to wear his hair in braids, to practice polygamy, and to use peyote in ceremonies suggested his continuing desire for an independent life.

National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

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  • Oct 09, 2013
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