The men of the 20th Maine who held Little Round Top on Gettysburg’s Second Day, against deadly fire, much of it coming from Devil’s Den. 
{Chamberlain possibly to the right of the woman that is seated}
In 1868, Charles Tyson sold his entire collection of battlefield negatives, and his studio, to William H. Tipton. An apprentice of the Tysons at the time of the battle, Tipton went on to become the most important Gettysburg photographer of the late 19th century. He had a photo studio right in Devils Den and for years served as the official battlefield photographer. His work includes countless views of monuments surrounded by veterans and dignitaries. No group of tourists in the late 1800s would think of leaving Gettysburg without having Tipton capture their visit amongst the rocks of Devil’s Den.
Credit: http://johnshepherdfamily.com/antiquegettysburgguidebook/devilsdenphotos/devilsden.php
Credit: http://www.virtualgettysburg.com/exhibit/photos/main.html

The men of the 20th Maine who held Little Round Top on Gettysburg’s Second Day, against deadly fire, much of it coming from Devil’s Den. 

{Chamberlain possibly to the right of the woman that is seated}

In 1868, Charles Tyson sold his entire collection of battlefield negatives, and his studio, to William H. Tipton. An apprentice of the Tysons at the time of the battle, Tipton went on to become the most important Gettysburg photographer of the late 19th century. He had a photo studio right in Devils Den and for years served as the official battlefield photographer. His work includes countless views of monuments surrounded by veterans and dignitaries. No group of tourists in the late 1800s would think of leaving Gettysburg without having Tipton capture their visit amongst the rocks of Devil’s Den.

Credit: http://johnshepherdfamily.com/antiquegettysburgguidebook/devilsdenphotos/devilsden.php

Credit: http://www.virtualgettysburg.com/exhibit/photos/main.html