The Civil War Parlor

”The dead continue to live by way of the resurrection we give them in telling their stories” -Stories of Real Human Beings Make History Powerful, Photographs Make it Immediate. A Blog Remembering the Men and Women of the American Civil War, North & South, people, faces, and a unique culture we will never see again. Photos and stories about the people that lived it, including African American Photographs, pre civil war photos and the period in cultural history that began just after the civil war. The historical info, photos and documents in this blog reflect the attitudes, perspectives, and beliefs of different times. This blog does not endorse the views expressed in some posts, which may contain materials offensive to some readers, you cannot compare the beliefs and ethical values of the people of the 1800's to the standards of today. Every effort is taken to remember the men and women of the Union and Confederacy equally with dignity and respect. The events of the war, and the men of the war, are fast fading from the public attention. Its history is growing to be an “Old, Old Story.” Public interest is weakening day by day. The memory of march, and camp, and battle-field, of the long and manly endurance, of the superb and uncomplaining courage, of the mass of sacrifice that redeemed the Nation, is fast dying out. Those who rejoice in the liberty and peace secured by the soldier’s suffering and privation, accept the benefits, but deny or forget the benefactor-1877 National Tribune.

Child Soldiers in the Civil War
Many boys lied about their age when enlisting; others were adopted as mascots by various military units. The exact number of underage soldiers is unknown, but some historians estimate the figure could be as high as 400,000. Many children were able to slip into the armed forces because recruiters were eager to fill quotas and usually didn’t question boys who looked eighteen years old. However, even boys who were obviously underage succeeding in getting in, and many were assigned as regimental musicians.
According to U.S. military records, 127 Union soldiers were just thirteen years old when they enlisted, 320 were fourteen years old, nearly 800 were fifteen years old, 2,758 were sixteen, and approximately 6,500 were seventeen. Statistics regarding the number of underage soldiers in the Confederate army are unknown, but most historians believe the numbers to be even higher.
 

Child Soldiers in the Civil War

Many boys lied about their age when enlisting; others were adopted as mascots by various military units. The exact number of underage soldiers is unknown, but some historians estimate the figure could be as high as 400,000. Many children were able to slip into the armed forces because recruiters were eager to fill quotas and usually didn’t question boys who looked eighteen years old. However, even boys who were obviously underage succeeding in getting in, and many were assigned as regimental musicians.

According to U.S. military records, 127 Union soldiers were just thirteen years old when they enlisted, 320 were fourteen years old, nearly 800 were fifteen years old, 2,758 were sixteen, and approximately 6,500 were seventeen. Statistics regarding the number of underage soldiers in the Confederate army are unknown, but most historians believe the numbers to be even higher.

 

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  • 12 months ago
  • Apr 21, 2013
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      400,000 seems awfully high, doesn’t it?
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