Sherman’s Demons
By MICHAEL FELLMAN Few Americans know, during the first year of the war, on Nov. 9, 1861, General Sherman, paralyzed by depression, was relieved of his command in Kentucky at his own request. Five weeks later, the wire services proclaimed to the nation: GENERAL WILLIAM T. SHERMAN INSANE. Sherman experienced erratic emotional ups and downs that he shared with his friends and family. He came back and soared to prominence, but his mental collapse and his recovery, unusually well documented, present a riveting example of the understanding of depressive illness in the Victorian world, and the relationship of bipolar illness to creativity and inspired leadership during difficult times. READ MORE HERE: http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/11/09/shermans-demons/

Sherman’s Demons

By MICHAEL FELLMAN Few Americans know, during the first year of the war, on Nov. 9, 1861, General Sherman, paralyzed by depression, was relieved of his command in Kentucky at his own request. Five weeks later, the wire services proclaimed to the nation: GENERAL WILLIAM T. SHERMAN INSANE. Sherman experienced erratic emotional ups and downs that he shared with his friends and family. He came back and soared to prominence, but his mental collapse and his recovery, unusually well documented, present a riveting example of the understanding of depressive illness in the Victorian world, and the relationship of bipolar illness to creativity and inspired leadership during difficult times. READ MORE HERE: http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/11/09/shermans-demons/