install theme
Apr 13, 2014
Ñ Robert E. Lee - Fashion Plate
Robert E. Lee, age 38, poses with his son, William Henry Fitzhugh Lee, 8, around the year 1845. At the time, Lee was twenty years into his military career having entered West Point in 1825, graduated second in his class, and earned a place in the Corps of Engineers. Historian Emory M. Thomas has suggested that “Lee is quite the fashion plate” in this image.
"His long, large sideburns, striped trousers, counter–striped vest, and hand–in–coat pose all seem a bit more pretentious than Lee usually was.” Thomas’s desire to judge Lee’s dress in the context of his character fits into a long tradition that includes Lost Cause biographers who saw his crisp Civil War–era attire as a reflection of “his modest humility, simplicity, and gentleness.”
Lee’s son, for a time nicknamed Rooney, ended the Civil War as second in command of the Confederate cavalry. He later served in the Senate of Virginia (1875–1878) and the United States House of Representatives (1887–1891).
Source: Encyclopedia Virgina

Robert E. Lee - Fashion Plate

Robert E. Lee, age 38, poses with his son, William Henry Fitzhugh Lee, 8, around the year 1845. At the time, Lee was twenty years into his military career having entered West Point in 1825, graduated second in his class, and earned a place in the Corps of Engineers. Historian Emory M. Thomas has suggested that “Lee is quite the fashion plate” in this image.

  • "His long, large sideburns, striped trousers, counter–striped vest, and hand–in–coat pose all seem a bit more pretentious than Lee usually was.” Thomas’s desire to judge Lee’s dress in the context of his character fits into a long tradition that includes Lost Cause biographers who saw his crisp Civil War–era attire as a reflection of “his modest humility, simplicity, and gentleness.”

Lee’s son, for a time nicknamed Rooney, ended the Civil War as second in command of the Confederate cavalry. He later served in the Senate of Virginia (1875–1878) and the United States House of Representatives (1887–1891).

Source: Encyclopedia Virgina

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Apr 12, 2014
Ñ Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock, 1824-1886
Hancock’s reputation as a war hero at Gettysburg, combined with his rare status as a prominent figure with impeccable Unionist credentials and pro-states’ rights views, made him a quadrennial presidential possibility in the years after the Civil War. His noted integrity was a counterpoint to the corruption of the era, for as President Rutherford B. Hayes said, 
… “If, when we make up our estimate of a public man, conspicuous both as a soldier and in civil life, we are to think first and chiefly of his manhood, his integrity, his purity, his singleness of purpose, and his unselfish devotion to duty, we can truthfully say of Hancock that he was through and through pure gold.”     
This nationwide popularity led the Democrats to nominate him for President in 1880. Although he ran a strong campaign, Hancock was narrowly defeated by Republican James A. Garfield.
Tucker, Glenn. Hancock the Superb. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill Co., 1960
Jordan, David M. Winfield Scott Hancock: A Soldier’s Life. Bloomfield: Indiana University Press, 1988
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock, 1824-1886

Hancock’s reputation as a war hero at Gettysburg, combined with his rare status as a prominent figure with impeccable Unionist credentials and pro-states’ rights views, made him a quadrennial presidential possibility in the years after the Civil War. His noted integrity was a counterpoint to the corruption of the era, for as President Rutherford B. Hayes said, 

… “If, when we make up our estimate of a public man, conspicuous both as a soldier and in civil life, we are to think first and chiefly of his manhood, his integrity, his purity, his singleness of purpose, and his unselfish devotion to duty, we can truthfully say of Hancock that he was through and through pure gold.”     

This nationwide popularity led the Democrats to nominate him for President in 1880. Although he ran a strong campaign, Hancock was narrowly defeated by Republican James A. Garfield.

Tucker, Glenn. Hancock the Superb. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill Co., 1960

Jordan, David M. Winfield Scott Hancock: A Soldier’s Life. Bloomfield: Indiana University Press, 1988

  • Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
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Apr 12, 2014
Ñ I don’t usually post anything but Civil War Pics on my TUMBLR but this disturbed me so much I had to share it.
What the hell is going on in our society??? Suicide selfie: Motorists stranded by man threatening to jump off bridge take photo with him about to jump off bridge in the background. LA freeway was shut in both directions for nearly three hours while police talked the man down - leaving heartless motorists to make their own entertainment. The ill-advised selfie was originally posted to the account of Instagram user Samdawg1 - who has since made his account private.http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/weird-news/suicide-selfie-motorists-stranded-man-3403963#ixzz2ygAeeRN2
COMMENTS FROM AROUND THE NET
"People have always been cruel. I think the anonymity of internet just gives them cover to be crueler."
Everywhere I go, I feel like people are much ruder than they were when I was growing up. It makes me wonder if one of the negatives of social media is the desensitization of the human race?
“When we didn’t have this type of technology, we seemed to get along much better,”  “We were probably saying good morning to the guy at the coffee shop.”
While 85 per cent of people aged 55 and over blame technology for our bad manners, 82 per cent of those ages 18 to 34 say the same and 86 per cent of those aged 35 to 54 point to technology as a culprit.
Those that want to argue that the internet has no effect whatsoever on the way we behave should ask the guy that was about to jump off that bridge how he feels about the cruel heartless people that didn’t give a shit if he lived or died. All they cared about was getting their faces plastered on the net… Would something like this have happened 100 years ago. NOT! What will become of us?
Read more at http://www.business2community.com/social-media/is-social-media-making-us-rude-0466194#FZlrhtcKfrtMCaD6.99

I don’t usually post anything but Civil War Pics on my TUMBLR but this disturbed me so much I had to share it.

What the hell is going on in our society??? Suicide selfie: Motorists stranded by man threatening to jump off bridge take photo with him about to jump off bridge in the background. LA freeway was shut in both directions for nearly three hours while police talked the man down - leaving heartless motorists to make their own entertainment. The ill-advised selfie was originally posted to the account of Instagram user Samdawg1 - who has since made his account private.
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/weird-news/suicide-selfie-motorists-stranded-man-3403963#ixzz2ygAeeRN2

COMMENTS FROM AROUND THE NET

"People have always been cruel. I think the anonymity of internet just gives them cover to be crueler."

Everywhere I go, I feel like people are much ruder than they were when I was growing up. It makes me wonder if one of the negatives of social media is the desensitization of the human race?

“When we didn’t have this type of technology, we seemed to get along much better,”  “We were probably saying good morning to the guy at the coffee shop.”

While 85 per cent of people aged 55 and over blame technology for our bad manners, 82 per cent of those ages 18 to 34 say the same and 86 per cent of those aged 35 to 54 point to technology as a culprit.

Those that want to argue that the internet has no effect whatsoever on the way we behave should ask the guy that was about to jump off that bridge how he feels about the cruel heartless people that didn’t give a shit if he lived or died. All they cared about was getting their faces plastered on the net… Would something like this have happened 100 years ago. NOT! What will become of us?

Read more at http://www.business2community.com/social-media/is-social-media-making-us-rude-0466194#FZlrhtcKfrtMCaD6.99

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Apr 12, 2014

Science Fiction And The American Civil War 

“Love”, The Low-Budget, Art House Feature Film Produced By Los Angeles Supergroup Angels & Airwaves. 

In 2039 Captain Lee Miller is an astronaut who finds himself stranded on the International Space Station without any communication with Earth nor any understanding of the world ending events that took place. He remains alone for six years, goes crazy in the absence of human interaction and starts hearing voices and interacting with figments of his imagination.

During this time he finds the journal of Lee Briggs, the 1864 Union soldier. We do not know how it got there, it might even be an implant in his imagination to facilitate his own journey to find the archive. The book tells of Brigg’s life as a soldier and his journey and discovery of something unknown and remarkable; however Briggs does not finish the book (or it was removed from the record). After some time Lee Miller attempts suicide, but does not go through with it. 

Privately funded budget for the film was estimated at $500,000, most sets and props were hand-built, and that all principal photography took place in a backyard in San Diego, California.

83-minutes of footage with nothing short of visual splendor, the story on the other hand suffers from lack of continuity, plot holes, and timid connections between Lee, the stranded ISS astronaut and his historical counterpart – an American Civil War captain from 1864. How’s that for a stretch?

Love has received a number of accolades in the international film circuit, including twelve official selections and Best Director (Eubank) at the 2011 Athens International Film Festival.

http://kevinsoon.wordpress.com/2012/01/24/film-review-love-2011/

http://filminterpretations.blogspot.com/2012/08/love-2011-by-william-eubank_14.html

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Apr 12, 2014

Mixing Science Fiction With The Civil War-

"Love" A Film From (2011)

During an 1864 battle of the American Civil War, a lone Union soldier, Captain Lee Briggs (Bradley Horne), is dispatched on a mission to investigate a mysterious object reported to Union forces.

175 years later, in the year 2039, United States Astronaut Lee Miller (Gunner Wright) is sent to the International Space Station as a one-man skeleton crew to examine if it is safe for use and to perform necessary modifications after it had been abandoned two decades earlier for reasons unknown. Shortly after arriving on board, tumultuous events break out on Earth, eventually resulting in Miller losing contact with CAPCOM and finding himself stranded in orbit alone, forced to helplessly watch events on Earth from portholes 200 miles above his home planet. 

"Love" is visually striking and an achievement of film making as it had an estimated 500K budget… very small considering the production value and VFX work involved.  Visually the film is fairly mind-blowing with amazing sets, effects and lighting. The civil war scenes are particularly spectacular, almost turning powerful war imagery into still paintings with the use of slow-mo and great digital effects. William Eubank’s visual aesthetic is solid and the things that are pulled off with a minimal budget are extremely impressive. Other than beauty it sounds like it may not have much more to offer. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Love_(2011_film)

http://youtu.be/OhcX-CnoLjM Source: http://tdotcomics.ca/toronto-after-dark-day-4/

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Apr 11, 2014

Civil War Museum’s Severed Arm From Antietam’s Battlefield~

Long after the guns grew silent at Antietam, the earth yielded up a gruesome reminder of the bloodiest day of the American Civil War: a severed limb, now the focus of intense study at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Maryland. 

A Sharpsburg-area farmer is said to have found the human forearm while plowing a field two weeks after the 1862 battle. Officials at the museum in Frederick, Md., are trying to learn more about the limb in hopes of verifying that it’s a relic of the Battle of Antietam.

The muddy-looking right forearm, with skin and hand attached, was donated anonymously to the museum earlier this year, said Executive Director George Wunderlich. It had been displayed for several decades at a private museum in Sharpsburg in a glass-topped, pine case with a placard reading, “Human arm found on the Antietam Battlefield.”

"Being able to put the story of this unknown person before this country is very important to us," Wunderlich said. "His remains will tell a story that will relate us back to his sacrifice. This was what they gave for what they believed. If done properly, it’s a very poignant story."

The unidentified farmer who found the limb put it in a barrel of brine, according to Thomas McGrath’s 1997 book, “Maryland September: True Stories from the Antietam Campaign.” The farmer reportedly gave it to a Boonsboro physician, who is said to have more permanently preserved it with embalming fluid.

The arm’s owner was probably a small man less than 20 years old, said William Gardner, a former Marshall University forensic medicine instructor who examined it in March. Since the elbow joint is undamaged, with no surgical saw marks, the arm was likely removed somewhere between the shoulder and elbow, he said. The forearm skin and tendons appear to have been violently twisted.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/04/11/md-civil-war-museum-gives_n_1418518.html

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Apr 10, 2014

Richard Caton Woodville- Pre Civil War Artist 

Over a remarkably short career that lasted just a decade due to his untimely death at age thirty from an overdose of morphine, Richard Caton Woodville (1825-1855) created an small but important body of work that engaged with the major issues dominating American society in the years leading up to the Civil War.

Themes touched on by Woodville’s paintings include: the politics of manifest destiny as played out in the Mexican War; the transformative effects of new technologies, including the railroad and the telegraph; and the rise of an ambitious class of visionary citizens intent on putting the ideals of democracy into practice.

His son Richard Caton Woodville, Jr. became a famous British battle scene painter

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Caton_Woodville

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Apr 10, 2014
Ñ Civil War Era Child’s Dress
This dress, worn by a boy or girl, is made with stylish detailing. The sleeves are of a fashionable shape and the bodice is carefully pleated instead of simply being gathered. The alternating pleats in the skirt show the sophisticated level of construction. Finishing the piece, the soutache braid has been stylishly applied, which was also used in adult clothing in the 1860s.
Date: ca. 1865 Culture: American Medium: wool Dimensions: Length at CB: 21 in. (53.3 cm) Credit Line: Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of The Jason and Peggy Westerfield Collection, 1969 Accession Number: 2009.300.930 http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/159516?rpp=20&pg=5&ao=on&ft=1860%27s+fashion&pos=98

Civil War Era Child’s Dress

This dress, worn by a boy or girl, is made with stylish detailing. The sleeves are of a fashionable shape and the bodice is carefully pleated instead of simply being gathered. The alternating pleats in the skirt show the sophisticated level of construction. Finishing the piece, the soutache braid has been stylishly applied, which was also used in adult clothing in the 1860s.

Date: ca. 1865 Culture: American Medium: wool Dimensions: Length at CB: 21 in. (53.3 cm) Credit Line: Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of The Jason and Peggy Westerfield Collection, 1969 Accession Number: 2009.300.930 http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/159516?rpp=20&pg=5&ao=on&ft=1860%27s+fashion&pos=98

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Apr 10, 2014
Ñ Civil War Era Dress - 1865
The female silhouette of the middle of the 19th century consisted of a fitted corseted bodice and wide full skirts. The conical skirts developed between the 1830s, when the high waist of the Empire silhouette was lowered and the skirts became more bell shaped, to the late 1860s, when the fullness of the skirts were pulled to the back and the bustle developed. The flared skirts of the period gradually increased in size throughout and were supported by a number of methods. Originally support came from multiple layers of petticoats which, due to weight and discomfort, were supplanted by underskirts comprised of graduated hoops made from materials such as baleen, cane and metal. The fashions during this time allowed the textiles to stand out because of the vast surface areas of the skirt and a relatively minimal amount of excess trim.
Date:ca. 1865 Culture: American Medium: silk, metal, cotton Dimensions: Length at CB: 60 in. (152.4 cm) Credit Line: Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Mrs. A. L. Lester, 1928 Accession Number: 2009.300.2987 http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/157873?rpp=20&pg=5&ao=on&ft=1860%27s+fashion&pos=81

Civil War Era Dress - 1865

The female silhouette of the middle of the 19th century consisted of a fitted corseted bodice and wide full skirts. The conical skirts developed between the 1830s, when the high waist of the Empire silhouette was lowered and the skirts became more bell shaped, to the late 1860s, when the fullness of the skirts were pulled to the back and the bustle developed. The flared skirts of the period gradually increased in size throughout and were supported by a number of methods. Originally support came from multiple layers of petticoats which, due to weight and discomfort, were supplanted by underskirts comprised of graduated hoops made from materials such as baleen, cane and metal. The fashions during this time allowed the textiles to stand out because of the vast surface areas of the skirt and a relatively minimal amount of excess trim.

Date:ca. 1865 Culture: American Medium: silk, metal, cotton Dimensions: Length at CB: 60 in. (152.4 cm) Credit Line: Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Mrs. A. L. Lester, 1928 Accession Number: 2009.300.2987 http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/157873?rpp=20&pg=5&ao=on&ft=1860%27s+fashion&pos=81

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Ñ Civil War Era Evening Dress 1860-62
The female silhouette of the middle of the 19th century consisted of a fitted corseted bodice and wide full skirts. The conical skirts developed between the 1830s, when the high waist of the Empire silhouette was lowered and the skirts became more bell shaped, to the late 1860s, when the fullness of the skirts were pulled to the back and the bustle developed. The flared skirts of the period gradually increased in size throughout and were supported by a number of methods. Originally support came from multiple layers of petticoats which, due to weight and discomfort, were supplanted by underskirts comprised of graduated hoops made from materials such as baleen, cane and metal. The fashions during this time allowed the textiles to stand out because of the vast surface areas of the skirt and a relatively minimal amount of excess trim.
Culture: American Medium: silk Dimensions: Length at CB: 58 in. (147.3 cm) Credit Line: Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Mrs. Willis McDonald, 1925 Accession Number:2009.300.2976
http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/157861?rpp=20&pg=4&ao=on&ft=1860%27s+fashion&pos=80

Civil War Era Evening Dress 1860-62

The female silhouette of the middle of the 19th century consisted of a fitted corseted bodice and wide full skirts. The conical skirts developed between the 1830s, when the high waist of the Empire silhouette was lowered and the skirts became more bell shaped, to the late 1860s, when the fullness of the skirts were pulled to the back and the bustle developed. The flared skirts of the period gradually increased in size throughout and were supported by a number of methods. Originally support came from multiple layers of petticoats which, due to weight and discomfort, were supplanted by underskirts comprised of graduated hoops made from materials such as baleen, cane and metal. The fashions during this time allowed the textiles to stand out because of the vast surface areas of the skirt and a relatively minimal amount of excess trim.

Culture: American Medium: silk Dimensions: Length at CB: 58 in. (147.3 cm) Credit Line: Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Mrs. Willis McDonald, 1925 Accession Number:2009.300.2976

http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/157861?rpp=20&pg=4&ao=on&ft=1860%27s+fashion&pos=80

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Ñ Ladies Boots 1865–75
Culture: Probably American Medium: cotton, silk Dimensions: 1 1/2 x 9 3/4 in. (3.8 x 24.8 cm) Credit Line: Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Herman Delman, 1954 Accession Number: 2009.300.1475a–d
Utilitarian shoes were often worn out and discarded, so it is fortunate to find a good quality specimen in fine condition. This pair of walking boots is serviceable but not particularly fashionable. The side lacing had been predominant for thirty years, but was going out of style in the 1860s to front lacing. Cloth uppers were also standard on earlier ladies’ boots; all-leather uppers did not become common until the 1860s.
http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/156193?rpp=20&pg=2&ao=on&ft=1860%27s+fashion&pos=32

Ladies Boots 1865–75

Culture: Probably American Medium: cotton, silk Dimensions: 1 1/2 x 9 3/4 in. (3.8 x 24.8 cm) Credit Line: Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Herman Delman, 1954 Accession Number: 2009.300.1475a–d

Utilitarian shoes were often worn out and discarded, so it is fortunate to find a good quality specimen in fine condition. This pair of walking boots is serviceable but not particularly fashionable. The side lacing had been predominant for thirty years, but was going out of style in the 1860s to front lacing. Cloth uppers were also standard on earlier ladies’ boots; all-leather uppers did not become common until the 1860s.

http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/156193?rpp=20&pg=2&ao=on&ft=1860%27s+fashion&pos=32

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Apr 10, 2014
Ñ Private George Ruoss, Co. G, 7th New York Volunteers 1865-1866- This Photograph Shows The Ravages Of Osteomyelitis. 
 
According to the medical history on the verso of this photograph, “Private George Ruoss, Co. G, 7th New York Volunteers, aged twenty-seven years, was wounded at the South Side Railroad, near Petersburg, Virginia, on March 31st, 1865, by a conoidal musket ball, which struck the anterior and outer aspect of the right thigh…comminuting portions of the upper and middle thirds of the femur, and passed out posteriorly about the middle of the gluteal fold.” Ruoss was taken to the corps hospital at City Point and after one week transferred to a general hospital in Washington. Two and one half years later Ruoss was still in “generally feeble condition,” a patient at the Post Hospital.
Before the use of antiseptics infection was considered a normal part of the healing process. During the Civil War, however, five infections were recognized as abnormal: tetanus, hospital gangrene, pyemia, erysipelas, and osteo myelitis. While the first four had a fatality rate of over ninety percent, with death ocurring within weeks of infection, osteomyelitis, a chronic bone infection, lasted for years. Slowly eating away at the bones of the patient, the infection was responsible for the majority of amputations after the war. This photograph shows the ravages of osteomyelitis. Although his complete medical history is unavailable Private Ruoss, fortunate not to have contracted one of the four fatal hospital infections, apparently survived his extended hospital stay.
Photo Reed Brockway Bontecou (American, 1824–1907) Former attribution to: William Bell (American (born England) Liverpool 1831–1910 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/283206?rpp=20&pg=1&rndkey=20140410&ao=on&ft=*&deptids=19&pos=13

Private George Ruoss, Co. G, 7th New York Volunteers 1865-1866- This Photograph Shows The Ravages Of Osteomyelitis. 

 

  • According to the medical history on the verso of this photograph, “Private George Ruoss, Co. G, 7th New York Volunteers, aged twenty-seven years, was wounded at the South Side Railroad, near Petersburg, Virginia, on March 31st, 1865, by a conoidal musket ball, which struck the anterior and outer aspect of the right thigh…comminuting portions of the upper and middle thirds of the femur, and passed out posteriorly about the middle of the gluteal fold.” Ruoss was taken to the corps hospital at City Point and after one week transferred to a general hospital in Washington. Two and one half years later Ruoss was still in “generally feeble condition,” a patient at the Post Hospital.
  • Before the use of antiseptics infection was considered a normal part of the healing process. During the Civil War, however, five infections were recognized as abnormal: tetanus, hospital gangrene, pyemia, erysipelas, and osteo myelitis. While the first four had a fatality rate of over ninety percent, with death ocurring within weeks of infection, osteomyelitis, a chronic bone infection, lasted for years. Slowly eating away at the bones of the patient, the infection was responsible for the majority of amputations after the war. This photograph shows the ravages of osteomyelitis. Although his complete medical history is unavailable Private Ruoss, fortunate not to have contracted one of the four fatal hospital infections, apparently survived his extended hospital stay.

Photo Reed Brockway Bontecou (American, 1824–1907) Former attribution to: William Bell (American (born England) Liverpool 1831–1910 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)

http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/283206?rpp=20&pg=1&rndkey=20140410&ao=on&ft=*&deptids=19&pos=13

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Ñ Stephen D. Wilbur 1865
Photo by Reed Brockway Bontecou (American, 1824–1907) Credit line: Gift of Stanley B. Burns, M.D. and The Burns Archive, 1992
Many Civil War surgeons reminiscing long after the war, lamented their lack of preparation for the difficulties of treating large numbers of severely wounded men.
 ‘Many of our surgeons had never seen the inside of the abdomen in a living subject…,’ one physician wrote, adding, 'Many of the surgeons of the Civil War had never witnessed a major amputation when they joined their regiments; very few of them had treated gunshot wounds.' Despite the lack of preparation, Union surgeons treated more than 400,000 wounded men–about 245,000 of them for gunshot or artillery wounds–and performed at least 40,000 operations. 
Less complete Confederate records show that fewer surgeons treated a similar number of patients. As would be expected, the numbers of surgeons grew exponentially as the war raged on. When the war began, there were 113 surgeons in the U.S. Army, of which 24 joined the Confederate army and 3 were dismissed for disloyalty. By war’s end, more than 12,000 surgeons had served in the Union army and about 3,200 in the Confederate.
http://www.historynet.com/the-truth-about-civil-war-surgery-2.htm
http://www.metmuseum.org/collections/search-the-collections/266769

Stephen D. Wilbur 1865

Photo by Reed Brockway Bontecou (American, 1824–1907) Credit line: Gift of Stanley B. Burns, M.D. and The Burns Archive, 1992

Many Civil War surgeons reminiscing long after the war, lamented their lack of preparation for the difficulties of treating large numbers of severely wounded men.

‘Many of our surgeons had never seen the inside of the abdomen in a living subject…,’ one physician wrote, adding, 'Many of the surgeons of the Civil War had never witnessed a major amputation when they joined their regiments; very few of them had treated gunshot wounds.' Despite the lack of preparation, Union surgeons treated more than 400,000 wounded men–about 245,000 of them for gunshot or artillery wounds–and performed at least 40,000 operations.

Less complete Confederate records show that fewer surgeons treated a similar number of patients. As would be expected, the numbers of surgeons grew exponentially as the war raged on. When the war began, there were 113 surgeons in the U.S. Army, of which 24 joined the Confederate army and 3 were dismissed for disloyalty. By war’s end, more than 12,000 surgeons had served in the Union army and about 3,200 in the Confederate.

http://www.historynet.com/the-truth-about-civil-war-surgery-2.htm

http://www.metmuseum.org/collections/search-the-collections/266769

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Corporal Israel Spotts, Company G, 200th Pennsylvania Volunteers

Photo by Reed Brockway Bontecou (American, 1824–1907)

Dr. Bontecou’s patient history for Corporal Spotts explains that nearing the end of his treatment, the wounded soldier deserted from the hospital. Presumably he believed he was healthy enough to head for home after three years of hard service. Spotts died four months later, on September 20, 1865.

Stanley B. Burns/The Burns Archive, http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/266773

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Apr 09, 2014
Ñ Post Civil War Lt. Henry O. Flipper’s Quest for Justice: 
"As Honorable A Record In The Army As Any Officer In It" In 1999, President Bill Clinton Issued Him A Full Pardon.
*If Ever There Was A Story That Should Be Told On Film-This Is It*
Born into slavery in Thomasville, Georgia, on March 21, 1856, Henry Ossian Flipper was appointed to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, in 1873. Over the next four years he overcame harassment, isolation, and insults to become West Point’s first African American graduate and the first African American commissioned officer in the regular U.S. Army. Flipper was stationed first at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, later served at Forts Elliott, Quitman, and Davis, Texas. He served as a signal officer and quartermaster, fought Apaches, installed telegraph lines, and supervised the building of roads. At Fort Sill, the young lieutenant directed the construction of a drainage system that helped prevent the spread of malaria. Still known as “Flipper’s Ditch,” the ditch is commemorated by a bronze marker at Fort Sill and the fort is listed as a National Historic Landmark.
In 1881, while serving at Fort Davis, Flipper’s commanding officer accused him of embezzling $3,791.77 from commissary funds. A court-martial found him not guilty of embezzlement but convicted him of conduct unbecoming an officer and ordered him dismissed from the Army.
After his dishonorable discharge, Flipper fought to clear his name as he pursued a career as an engineer and an expert on Spanish and Mexican land law. In 1898, a bill reinstating him into the Army and restoring his rank was introduced in Congress on his behalf. To bolster his case, he sent Congressman John A. T. Hull, chairman of the House Committee on Military Affairs, the letter (see link below) along with a brief supporting the bill’s passage. Flipper’s letter to Hull is an eloquent statement asking Congress for “that justice which every American citizen has the right to ask.” The bill and several later ones were tabled, and Flipper died in 1940 without vindication, but in 1976, the Army granted him an honorable discharge, and in 1999, President Bill Clinton issued him a full pardon.
The National Archives and Records Administration is pleased to present these documents from the career of a man who served his country with honor and fought injustice tenaciously.
http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/henry_o_flipper/

Post Civil War Lt. Henry O. Flipper’s Quest for Justice: 

"As Honorable A Record In The Army As Any Officer In It" In 1999, President Bill Clinton Issued Him A Full Pardon.

*If Ever There Was A Story That Should Be Told On Film-This Is It*

Born into slavery in Thomasville, Georgia, on March 21, 1856, Henry Ossian Flipper was appointed to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, in 1873. Over the next four years he overcame harassment, isolation, and insults to become West Point’s first African American graduate and the first African American commissioned officer in the regular U.S. Army. Flipper was stationed first at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, later served at Forts Elliott, Quitman, and Davis, Texas. He served as a signal officer and quartermaster, fought Apaches, installed telegraph lines, and supervised the building of roads. At Fort Sill, the young lieutenant directed the construction of a drainage system that helped prevent the spread of malaria. Still known as “Flipper’s Ditch,” the ditch is commemorated by a bronze marker at Fort Sill and the fort is listed as a National Historic Landmark.

In 1881, while serving at Fort Davis, Flipper’s commanding officer accused him of embezzling $3,791.77 from commissary funds. A court-martial found him not guilty of embezzlement but convicted him of conduct unbecoming an officer and ordered him dismissed from the Army.

After his dishonorable discharge, Flipper fought to clear his name as he pursued a career as an engineer and an expert on Spanish and Mexican land law. In 1898, a bill reinstating him into the Army and restoring his rank was introduced in Congress on his behalf. To bolster his case, he sent Congressman John A. T. Hull, chairman of the House Committee on Military Affairs, the letter (see link below) along with a brief supporting the bill’s passage. Flipper’s letter to Hull is an eloquent statement asking Congress for “that justice which every American citizen has the right to ask.” The bill and several later ones were tabled, and Flipper died in 1940 without vindication, but in 1976, the Army granted him an honorable discharge, and in 1999, President Bill Clinton issued him a full pardon.

The National Archives and Records Administration is pleased to present these documents from the career of a man who served his country with honor and fought injustice tenaciously.

http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/henry_o_flipper/

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