heavy-historian asked:

As a Choctaw historian, I have a correction to submit. The Choctaws did not own nearly 6,000 slaves as your article claims, but rather a hair under 2,300. The US gov extended the 1860 federal census into Indian Territory to catalog slaves by tribes. The largest Choctaw owner was Robert M Jones at close to 400. My own work in American Indian Quarterly can also confirm this.

The Choctaw wiki page has near the same number sourced. If the information is not correct I’d contact the wikipedia page for the correction.

(Native Americans in the American Civil War) wiki page.-This is the source listed for the number of 6,000, I always make sure I include the info in its entire paragraph when I post, listed with sources. 

The Choctaw owned nearly 6000 slaves.[6] Museum of The Red River is the source given on wiki. 

Beginning in 1894, the Dawes Commission was established to register Choctaw and other families of the Indian Territory, so that the former tribal lands could be properly distributed among them. The final list included 18,981 citizens of the Choctaw Nation, 1,639 Mississippi Choctaw, and 5,994 former slaves, most held by Choctaws in the Indian/Oklahoma Territory. Book- (The Choctaws in Oklahoma From Tribe To Nation By Kidwell) Choctaw wiki page..

We cannot correct numbers all over the web or in books. I can only post info with sources where I find the info. Unfortunately once something is posted on TUMBLR and reblogged there is No possible way to correct anything…a site flaw. Unfortunately I don’t have time to analyze every number or the info I post here, I wouldn’t have time to work! I can only post sources and let people take it from there. Thanks for the correction.

An Unidentified Woman Seated On Lookout Mountain Circa 1860’s
Tennessee State Library and Archives-Civil War Women
Ulysses S. Grant would write in his memoirs: ”The Battle of Lookout Mountain is one of the romances of the war. There was no such battle and no action even worthy to be called a battle on Lookout Mountain. It is all poetry.” 
Lookout Mountain rises 1700 feet above the Tennessee Valley, its steep sides protruding to the sky. On the northern end the mountain is surrounded on three sides by a near vertical rock wall that has afforded protection to the occupants of the top for hundreds of years. 
The mountain is known for a weather phenomenon that occurs from 3-5 times a year. A layer of fog forms around the bottom of Lookout Mountain then begins to rise, sometimes engulfing the entire mountain. This rising fog has been written about since the first settlers visited the area before 1735. On November_24, 1863,  this weather anomaly set in, creating the most poetic name for any battle in the American Civil War, The Battle Above the Clouds. 
While TSLA houses an item, it does not necessarily hold the copyright on the item, nor may it be able to determine if the item is still protected under current copyright law. Users are solely responsible for determining the existence of such instances and for obtaining any other permissions and paying associated fees that may be necessary for the intended use.
http://cdm15138.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15138coll15/id/68/rec/24
http://www.aboutnorthgeorgia.com/ang/Battle_Above_the_Clouds

An Unidentified Woman Seated On Lookout Mountain Circa 1860’s

Tennessee State Library and Archives-Civil War Women

Ulysses S. Grant would write in his memoirs: ”The Battle of Lookout Mountain is one of the romances of the war. There was no such battle and no action even worthy to be called a battle on Lookout Mountain. It is all poetry.” 

Lookout Mountain rises 1700 feet above the Tennessee Valley, its steep sides protruding to the sky. On the northern end the mountain is surrounded on three sides by a near vertical rock wall that has afforded protection to the occupants of the top for hundreds of years. 

The mountain is known for a weather phenomenon that occurs from 3-5 times a year. A layer of fog forms around the bottom of Lookout Mountain then begins to rise, sometimes engulfing the entire mountain. This rising fog has been written about since the first settlers visited the area before 1735. On November_241863,  this weather anomaly set in, creating the most poetic name for any battle in the American Civil War, The Battle Above the Clouds. 

While TSLA houses an item, it does not necessarily hold the copyright on the item, nor may it be able to determine if the item is still protected under current copyright law. Users are solely responsible for determining the existence of such instances and for obtaining any other permissions and paying associated fees that may be necessary for the intended use.

http://cdm15138.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15138coll15/id/68/rec/24

http://www.aboutnorthgeorgia.com/ang/Battle_Above_the_Clouds

Southern Women Of The Civil War
Nannie Haskins And Friends Carte de Viste Tennessee State Library And Archives
Nannie front row left- and her three friends Hattie Donoho, Janie Moore, and Dora Judkins.
Nannie E. Haskins (1846-1930) was a native of Clarksville Tennessee, and kept diaries of her experiences during the Civil War. In 1870 she married Henry Phillips Williams and moved to Birmingham Alabama.
While TSLA houses an item, it does not necessarily hold the copyright on the item, nor may it be able to determine if the item is still protected under current copyright law. Users are solely responsible for determining the existence of such instances and for obtaining any other permissions and paying associated fees that may be necessary for the intended use.
http://cdm15138.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15138coll15/id/64/rec/20

Southern Women Of The Civil War

Nannie Haskins And Friends Carte de Viste Tennessee State Library And Archives

Nannie front row left- and her three friends Hattie Donoho, Janie Moore, and Dora Judkins.

Nannie E. Haskins (1846-1930) was a native of Clarksville Tennessee, and kept diaries of her experiences during the Civil War. In 1870 she married Henry Phillips Williams and moved to Birmingham Alabama.

While TSLA houses an item, it does not necessarily hold the copyright on the item, nor may it be able to determine if the item is still protected under current copyright law. Users are solely responsible for determining the existence of such instances and for obtaining any other permissions and paying associated fees that may be necessary for the intended use.

http://cdm15138.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15138coll15/id/64/rec/20

Unknown Pennsylvania Zouave-Style Jacket
A blue wool short jacket with tight weave pattern sharing characteristics of late war construction, trimmed with two welts of narrow red braid (similar to Birney?s Zouaves) giving the illusion of a false vest, with distinct sky blue cuffs beneath interwoven red sleeve braiding of unknown regimental association.
The jacket combines a false vest with a true short trimmed collar, shared characteristics that cannot be documented in a Civil War context. The combination of red piped trim and solid sky blue seems to be unique to Pennsylvania Civil War Zouave regiments. Apart from the perplexing exterior details, the coat is made with glazed brown cotton lining having a single interior pocket on the left side with separate striped glazed cotton lined sleeves, a characteristic usually, but not always associated with post-war construction.The nine small eagle buttons including some others are a combination of stamped Horstmann and post-Civil War Pettibone manufacture mixed with unmarked examples. Accepting that buttons are easily substituted, it should be pointed out that the Pettibone Manufacturing Company produced military buttons from about 1880 to 1920.
A number of the post-war Philadelphia militia commands and later Pennsylvania National Guard (PNG) regiments from 1870 onwards are known to have adopted widely variant Zouave-style uniforms during the 1865 to 1872 period before the popularity waned, but details are generally sparse. For example, the Gray Reserves, later the 1st Regiment PNG wore a ?dark blue chasseur coat and sky blue facings? from 1865 to 1869. The Philadelphia Fire Zouaves, later the 4th Regiment PNG, were uniformed in a ?blue jacket trimmed with red?with sky blue vest? from 1870 to 1873. (Lacking certain provenance this military uniform jacket cannot be substantively documented in a Civil War context), while the ambiguous style and finer points of construction would seem to point to an immediate post-war time frame. Still, it is impossible to say with absolute certainty the origin and usage of the coat except to say that it is American. 
Condition:  Jacket with scattered heavy external moth damage and heavy wear inside collar, about VG-. http://www.cowanauctions.com/auctions/item.aspx?id=34996

Unknown Pennsylvania Zouave-Style Jacket

A blue wool short jacket with tight weave pattern sharing characteristics of late war construction, trimmed with two welts of narrow red braid (similar to Birney?s Zouaves) giving the illusion of a false vest, with distinct sky blue cuffs beneath interwoven red sleeve braiding of unknown regimental association.

The jacket combines a false vest with a true short trimmed collar, shared characteristics that cannot be documented in a Civil War context. The combination of red piped trim and solid sky blue seems to be unique to Pennsylvania Civil War Zouave regiments. Apart from the perplexing exterior details, the coat is made with glazed brown cotton lining having a single interior pocket on the left side with separate striped glazed cotton lined sleeves, a characteristic usually, but not always associated with post-war construction.The nine small eagle buttons including some others are a combination of stamped Horstmann and post-Civil War Pettibone manufacture mixed with unmarked examples. Accepting that buttons are easily substituted, it should be pointed out that the Pettibone Manufacturing Company produced military buttons from about 1880 to 1920.

A number of the post-war Philadelphia militia commands and later Pennsylvania National Guard (PNG) regiments from 1870 onwards are known to have adopted widely variant Zouave-style uniforms during the 1865 to 1872 period before the popularity waned, but details are generally sparse. For example, the Gray Reserves, later the 1st Regiment PNG wore a ?dark blue chasseur coat and sky blue facings? from 1865 to 1869. The Philadelphia Fire Zouaves, later the 4th Regiment PNG, were uniformed in a ?blue jacket trimmed with red?with sky blue vest? from 1870 to 1873. (Lacking certain provenance this military uniform jacket cannot be substantively documented in a Civil War context), while the ambiguous style and finer points of construction would seem to point to an immediate post-war time frame. Still, it is impossible to say with absolute certainty the origin and usage of the coat except to say that it is American. 

Condition:  Jacket with scattered heavy external moth damage and heavy wear inside collar, about VG-. http://www.cowanauctions.com/auctions/item.aspx?id=34996

US Army Regulation M1853/55 Non-Rigid Knapsack,
Right shoulder strap stamped Wm Butterfield/New York with additional New York inspector’s stamp and Aug. 15. 1864 date. 
Condition: Knapsack shows significant damage to upper left front edge with a large quarter-sized hole in front flap. Leather straps dry and flaking but complete and without tears. Minor inside verdigris, G+. Cowan’s Auctions http://www.cowanauctions.com/auctions/item.aspx?id=33771
US Army Regulation M1853/55 Non-Rigid Knapsack,
Right shoulder strap stamped Wm Butterfield/New York with additional New York inspector’s stamp and Aug. 15. 1864 date. 
Condition: Knapsack shows significant damage to upper left front edge with a large quarter-sized hole in front flap. Leather straps dry and flaking but complete and without tears. Minor inside verdigris, G+. Cowan’s Auctions http://www.cowanauctions.com/auctions/item.aspx?id=33771

Rare CDV Of Woman Dressed As A Soldier

No back mark, with cryptic pencil identification of Leona Houston on verso with “from New Hampshire cdv album” in modern hand. “Leona Houston” or her alias could not be located in the extensive bibliography dedicated to women soldiers of the Civil War. It is therefore assumed that the civilian Leona, whatever her background, simply posed in military garb as a patriotic gesture or possibly in the guise of an adopted daughter associated with an unknown regiment. Clearly, there is no obvious attempt here to hide or alter her gender. She wears a custom three button sack coat and stylized M1858 officer’s hat with upturned brim and feather. A narrow welt along the trouser seam is indicative of staff rank. 

Condition:  The cdv is quite clear and virtually mint, EXC. Cowan’s Auctions
Rare CDV Of Woman Dressed As A Soldier

No back mark, with cryptic pencil identification of Leona Houston on verso with “from New Hampshire cdv album” in modern hand. “Leona Houston” or her alias could not be located in the extensive bibliography dedicated to women soldiers of the Civil War. It is therefore assumed that the civilian Leona, whatever her background, simply posed in military garb as a patriotic gesture or possibly in the guise of an adopted daughter associated with an unknown regiment. Clearly, there is no obvious attempt here to hide or alter her gender. She wears a custom three button sack coat and stylized M1858 officer’s hat with upturned brim and feather. A narrow welt along the trouser seam is indicative of staff rank. 

Condition:  The cdv is quite clear and virtually mint, EXC. Cowan’s Auctions

Elida B. Rumsey Sang For Civil War Soldiers And Established A Free Library 
Seventeen-year-old Elida Rumsey went to Washington during the Civil War to become a nurse. A girl so young that Miss Dorothea Dix would not hire her. When told she was too young, Elida sang to soldiers in the wards.
In Nov. ’61, she began to visit the hospitals and sing to the soldiers, The soldiers planned what they wanted her to sing from week to week and the knowledge of how little the boys had to look forward to from day to day, while under such depressing influences, first inspired the thought of supplying them with pictures and books.  With the help of Mrs. Walter Baker, Elida organized a soldiers’ library. She eventually became the youngest member of the Massachusetts Army Nurses. After the war, Elida and her husband John Fowle moved to Upham’s Corner, where she raised two emancipated slave children and did local civic work.
http://bwht.org/women-of-uphams-corner-walking-tour-2/
http://www.dorchesterhistoricalsociety.org/blog/?p=666

Elida B. Rumsey Sang For Civil War Soldiers And Established A Free Library 

Seventeen-year-old Elida Rumsey went to Washington during the Civil War to become a nurse. A girl so young that Miss Dorothea Dix would not hire her. When told she was too young, Elida sang to soldiers in the wards.

In Nov. ’61, she began to visit the hospitals and sing to the soldiers, The soldiers planned what they wanted her to sing from week to week and the knowledge of how little the boys had to look forward to from day to day, while under such depressing influences, first inspired the thought of supplying them with pictures and books.  With the help of Mrs. Walter Baker, Elida organized a soldiers’ library. She eventually became the youngest member of the Massachusetts Army Nurses. After the war, Elida and her husband John Fowle moved to Upham’s Corner, where she raised two emancipated slave children and did local civic work.

http://bwht.org/women-of-uphams-corner-walking-tour-2/

http://www.dorchesterhistoricalsociety.org/blog/?p=666

Soldiers’ Aid Society in Cleveland from the Encyclopedia of Cleveland History
A group of women from various Cleveland churches first met as the Ladies Aid Society on  April 20,1861. and organized a “blanket raid” to collect quilts and blankets for troops being mustered at Camp Taylor, one of the 7 camps in Cleveland.  The official war was new and the ladies had no idea what was ahead of them. Six months later the group joined with other benevolent groups to form the Soldiers’ Aid Society of Northern Ohio.  Financed by private donations, the organization cared for the sick and wounded, provided ambulance and hospital service, solicited clothing and medical supplies, and sent food to soldiers in the field throughout the Civil War. The society established a distribution center at 95 Bank (W. 6th) St.
In 1863 the Ladies Aid Society of Pleasant Township in Knox County reported they had collected the following for the war effort: 
shirts, 91;
drawers, 65 pairs;
pocket handkerchiefs, 138;
pillow slips, 42;
pillows, 10;
sheets, 6;
towels, 35;
socks, 9 pairs;
mittens, 2 pairs;
compresses, 32 rolls;
bandages, 59 rolls;
5 bundles of papers and magazines,
1 pound of hops,
53 pads,
13 fans,
2 neckties,
3 boxes 2 rolls and 1 sack of lint,
32 pounds of crackers,
6 pounds of dry toast,
10 dozen pickles,
4 quarts of vinegar,
18 jugs of canned fruit and pickles,
42 bushels of apples,
7 quarts of dried peaches,
23 quarts of elderberries,
14 quarts of dried cherries,
5 quarts of sweet corn,
3 quarts canned fruit,
13 bushels of potatoes,
2$ bushels of onions,
1 bushel of beets, and
one bushel of cabbage.
http://www.rosecransheadquarters.org/LadiesAid/Sanitation.htm#soldiers Aid

Soldiers’ Aid Society in Cleveland from the Encyclopedia of Cleveland History

A group of women from various Cleveland churches first met as the Ladies Aid Society on  April 20,1861. and organized a “blanket raid” to collect quilts and blankets for troops being mustered at Camp Taylor, one of the 7 camps in Cleveland.  The official war was new and the ladies had no idea what was ahead of them. Six months later the group joined with other benevolent groups to form the Soldiers’ Aid Society of Northern Ohio.  Financed by private donations, the organization cared for the sick and wounded, provided ambulance and hospital service, solicited clothing and medical supplies, and sent food to soldiers in the field throughout the Civil War. The society established a distribution center at 95 Bank (W. 6th) St.

In 1863 the Ladies Aid Society of Pleasant Township in Knox County reported they had collected the following for the war effort: 

  • shirts, 91;
  • drawers, 65 pairs;
  • pocket handkerchiefs, 138;
  • pillow slips, 42;
  • pillows, 10;
  • sheets, 6;
  • towels, 35;
  • socks, 9 pairs;
  • mittens, 2 pairs;
  • compresses, 32 rolls;
  • bandages, 59 rolls;
  • 5 bundles of papers and magazines,
  • 1 pound of hops,
  • 53 pads,
  • 13 fans,
  • 2 neckties,
  • 3 boxes 2 rolls and 1 sack of lint,
  • 32 pounds of crackers,
  • 6 pounds of dry toast,
  • 10 dozen pickles,
  • 4 quarts of vinegar,
  • 18 jugs of canned fruit and pickles,
  • 42 bushels of apples,
  • 7 quarts of dried peaches,
  • 23 quarts of elderberries,
  • 14 quarts of dried cherries,
  • 5 quarts of sweet corn,
  • 3 quarts canned fruit,
  • 13 bushels of potatoes,
  • 2$ bushels of onions,
  • 1 bushel of beets, and
  • one bushel of cabbage.

http://www.rosecransheadquarters.org/LadiesAid/Sanitation.htm#soldiers Aid

Ladies In Camp, ca. 1862
National Archives, Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer.
When the American Civil War broke out in 1861, women turned their attention, and their considerable energy, to the conflict. In both the North and the South, women gathered in aid societies, circulated petitions, and, at home, took over the masculine duties of running the household. While these activities kept the women at home busy, many women wanted to support their causes closer to the battlefield. Rather than face low-paying, grueling factory work or even prostitution, poorer women followed their husbands, brothers or fathers to camp.
Sara M. Evans Born for Liberty. (New York: Free Press Paperbacks, 1997) 

Ladies In Camp, ca. 1862

National Archives, Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer.

When the American Civil War broke out in 1861, women turned their attention, and their considerable energy, to the conflict. In both the North and the South, women gathered in aid societies, circulated petitions, and, at home, took over the masculine duties of running the household. While these activities kept the women at home busy, many women wanted to support their causes closer to the battlefield. Rather than face low-paying, grueling factory work or even prostitution, poorer women followed their husbands, brothers or fathers to camp.

Sara M. Evans Born for Liberty. (New York: Free Press Paperbacks, 1997) 

Made a correction to the fold3 information I posted on Black Dog Confederate Soldier Last night. The site had info errors and wrong dates posted.
Correct info has been added. The worst part about Tumblr is you cannot correct posts after they are reblogged 100 times..

Black Dog- Chief Of The Osage Indians And Confederate Soldier

Black Dog II 1827-1910

1876 (14-years after he was Captain of Company B

1st Osage Battalion, C.S.A. Confederate States of America

fought two battles in NW Arkansas during the Civil War)

Photo Taken Nineteen Hours After The Last Day’s Battle On The Field At Gettysburg 1863 
The turning point of the Civil War is the Battle of Gettysburg. From that day the Confederate cause began to wane. Few battles of modern times show such great percentage of loss. Out of the one hundred and sixty thousand men engaged on both sides, forty-four thousand were killed or wounded. Brady’s cameras reached the field of battle in time to perpetuate some of its scenes. The ghastliness of the pictures is such that it is with some hesitation that any of them are presented in these pages. It is on the horrors of war, however, that all pleas of peace are based. Only by depicting its gruesomeness can the age of arbitration be hastened. It is with this in mind that this photograph is here revealed. There is probably not another in existence that witnesses more fearful tragedy. 
The photograph is taken on the field of Gettysburg about nineteen hours after the last day’s battle. It shows a Union soldier terribly mutilated by a shell of a Confederate gun. His arm is torn off and may be seen on the ground near his musket. The shell that killed this soldier disemboweled him in its fiendishness. This picture is as wonderful as it is horrible and should do more in the interest of peace than any possible argument. 
Something of the bloodshed on the battlefield of Gettysburg may be understood when it is considered that the battlefield, which covered nearly twenty-five square miles, was literally strewn with dead bodies, many of them mutilated even worse than the one in this picture. The surviving veterans of Gettysburg have seen war’s most horrible aspects. Gallant and daring commanders led those brave men in that three days’ inferno, from the first to the third of July, in 1863.
The Project Gutenburg EBook of Original Photographs Taken on the Battlefields during the Civil War by Mathew Brady and Alexander Gardner

Photo Taken Nineteen Hours After The Last Day’s Battle On The Field At Gettysburg 1863 

The turning point of the Civil War is the Battle of Gettysburg. From that day the Confederate cause began to wane. Few battles of modern times show such great percentage of loss. Out of the one hundred and sixty thousand men engaged on both sides, forty-four thousand were killed or wounded. Brady’s cameras reached the field of battle in time to perpetuate some of its scenes. The ghastliness of the pictures is such that it is with some hesitation that any of them are presented in these pages. It is on the horrors of war, however, that all pleas of peace are based. Only by depicting its gruesomeness can the age of arbitration be hastened. It is with this in mind that this photograph is here revealed. There is probably not another in existence that witnesses more fearful tragedy.

The photograph is taken on the field of Gettysburg about nineteen hours after the last day’s battle. It shows a Union soldier terribly mutilated by a shell of a Confederate gun. His arm is torn off and may be seen on the ground near his musket. The shell that killed this soldier disemboweled him in its fiendishness. This picture is as wonderful as it is horrible and should do more in the interest of peace than any possible argument.

Something of the bloodshed on the battlefield of Gettysburg may be understood when it is considered that the battlefield, which covered nearly twenty-five square miles, was literally strewn with dead bodies, many of them mutilated even worse than the one in this picture. The surviving veterans of Gettysburg have seen war’s most horrible aspects. Gallant and daring commanders led those brave men in that three days’ inferno, from the first to the third of July, in 1863.

The Project Gutenburg EBook of Original Photographs Taken on the Battlefields during the Civil War by Mathew Brady and Alexander Gardner

General Meade And General Sedgwick With Staff Officers At Rappahannock Station , March, 1864
Sedgwick was the highest ranking Union casualty in the Civil War
Both armies faced each other in full force at Spottsylvania Court House in the forenoon of the ninth of May, 1864. The Brady cameras arrived with the Government supply trains and perpetuated the historic scenes. While the Union lines were placing their batteries, they were fired on by sharpshooters, and General Sedgwick was killed. His death was a great loss to the Federals, just as Jackson’s had crippled the Confederacy. 
The Project Gutenberg EBook of Original Photographs Taken on the
Battlefields during the Civil War of the United States, by Mathew B. Brady and Alexander Gardner

General Meade And General Sedgwick With Staff Officers At Rappahannock Station , March, 1864

Sedgwick was the highest ranking Union casualty in the Civil War

Both armies faced each other in full force at Spottsylvania Court House in the forenoon of the ninth of May, 1864. The Brady cameras arrived with the Government supply trains and perpetuated the historic scenes. While the Union lines were placing their batteries, they were fired on by sharpshooters, and General Sedgwick was killed. His death was a great loss to the Federals, just as Jackson’s had crippled the Confederacy. 

The Project Gutenberg EBook of Original Photographs Taken on the
Battlefields during the Civil War of the United States, by Mathew B. Brady and Alexander Gardner

Rare Photo Of Major-General McClellan And His Officers in 1862
After the evacuation of Yorktown on the fourth of May, in 1862, this picture was taken. It shows the generals of the Army of the Potomac in full uniforms after the hard siege, and at the very time when they were maneuvering to drive back the Confederates, forcing them to stand in defense of the Capital of the Confederacy—Richmond. 
It was through the personal friendship of Major-General McClellan that Brady was allowed to take this rare photograph. The warriors lined up in front of the camera on the field at Yorktown. In the center is General McClellan—a man in whose veins flowed the blood of Scotch cautiousness—”Be sure you’re right, then go ahead!” He was but thirty-six years of age when he held the great army under his control. From boyhood he had been a military tactician. When twenty years old he was graduated from West Point, standing second in his class, and distinguished himself for gallantry in the Mexican War. 
Six years before the outbreak of the Civil War, when only thirty years old, McClellan was in Crimea and two years later he submitted his report to the Government and resigned from the army to become vice-president and chief engineer of the Illinois Central Railroad. In 1860, he was general superintendent of the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad. When the call swept across the continent for troops to preserve the Nation, the old war spirit was aroused and McClellan was one of the first to respond.
Source: The Project Gutenberg EBook of Original Photographs Taken on the Battlefields during the Civil War, by Mathew B. Brady and Alexander Gardner

Rare Photo Of Major-General McClellan And His Officers in 1862

After the evacuation of Yorktown on the fourth of May, in 1862, this picture was taken. It shows the generals of the Army of the Potomac in full uniforms after the hard siege, and at the very time when they were maneuvering to drive back the Confederates, forcing them to stand in defense of the Capital of the Confederacy—Richmond.

It was through the personal friendship of Major-General McClellan that Brady was allowed to take this rare photograph. The warriors lined up in front of the camera on the field at Yorktown. In the center is General McClellan—a man in whose veins flowed the blood of Scotch cautiousness—”Be sure you’re right, then go ahead!” He was but thirty-six years of age when he held the great army under his control. From boyhood he had been a military tactician. When twenty years old he was graduated from West Point, standing second in his class, and distinguished himself for gallantry in the Mexican War.

Six years before the outbreak of the Civil War, when only thirty years old, McClellan was in Crimea and two years later he submitted his report to the Government and resigned from the army to become vice-president and chief engineer of the Illinois Central Railroad. In 1860, he was general superintendent of the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad. When the call swept across the continent for troops to preserve the Nation, the old war spirit was aroused and McClellan was one of the first to respond.

Source: The Project Gutenberg EBook of Original Photographs Taken on the Battlefields during the Civil War, by Mathew B. Brady and Alexander Gardner

Photographer Timothy Sullivan captured officers of the 60th New York at the famous Fauquier Sulphur Springs in August, 1862.
Nestled near the banks of the Rappahannock River, two beautiful hotels on the site were destroyed during the fighting between General Pope and General Jackson shortly after this photograph was taken.  It is still unknown which side caused the fires which consumed the hotels.  The Fauquier Springs Country Club stands on the site today, about 7 miles south of Warrenton.
http://www.13thmass.org/1862/pope.html

Photographer Timothy Sullivan captured officers of the 60th New York at the famous Fauquier Sulphur Springs in August, 1862.

Nestled near the banks of the Rappahannock River, two beautiful hotels on the site were destroyed during the fighting between General Pope and General Jackson shortly after this photograph was taken.  It is still unknown which side caused the fires which consumed the hotels.  The Fauquier Springs Country Club stands on the site today, about 7 miles south of Warrenton.

http://www.13thmass.org/1862/pope.html