Sixth Plate Ambrotype Of Three Civil War Brothers From Indiana

In civilian clothes with pencil notation in back of case that reads,Isaac J. Wesley R. Smith J/all true soldiers/the star spangled banner/long may it wave. Consignor attributed the brothers to the three-month 118th Indiana Infantry. Cowan’s Auctions 

Indiana regiments played significant roles in the war. For example, the Nineteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment, part of the famed Iron Brigade, fought valiantly at the Battle of Antietam and at Gettysburg. Other Hoosier regiments participated in battles at Shiloh, Chancellorsville, Chickamauga, Vicksburg and others.

Reference: Indiana in the Civil War http://www.indianahistory.org/teachers-students/teacher-resources/classroom-tools/civil-war#.VEQYbfldVIk

Civil War Confederate Great Coats

Photo: Unidentified soldier in 1st Virginia cavalry great coat, Library of Congress, Photo Made between 1861 and 1865

Most of the Great Coats were sky blue. Union & Confederate.

Confederate use of the sky blue great coat was common because:

  • Most of the great coats were of U.S. manufacture
  • Many were taken from U.S. supply facilities
  • Many were taken from dead Union soldier’s
  • The confederates were busy making uniform coats… wool shortages.
  • Great Coats were made of sky blue wool. The body would be lined in burlap or heavy canvas, and the sleeves would be lined in muslin.  
  • Information from click through link http://winchestersutler.com/CoatGreat.html

Unknown Soldiers- American Civil War

The average infantryman carried a muzzle-loading rifle-musket manufactured in American arsenals or one purchased from foreign countries such as England. The bayonet was an important part of the rifle and its steel presence on the muzzle of the weapon was very imposing. When not in battle, the bayonet was a handy candle holder and useful in grinding coffee beans. The typical rifle-musket weighed eight and one-half pounds and fired a conical shaped bullet called the Minie Ball.

Info: The National Park Service www.nps.gov

  • Date Created/Published: [between 1861 and 1869]
  • Medium: 1 negative : glass, wet collodion.
  • Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington,  D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

First Summer Of The Rebellion, Franklin Square, ‘The N.Y. 12th’

MARINE’S WALK ACROSS AMERICA REACHES SAN DIEGO! 

Marine Veteran Justin Kuhel, Walked Across America In Hopes Of Raising $100,000 For Two Nonprofits That Assist Disabled Veterans

Sometimes you see a story so inspiring that you have to blog about it even if the topic has nothing to do with your blog, this is one story worth sharing! How many of us would give up our lives for months at a time to help others? Please take a look at Justin’s page and donate, he needs our help TUMBLR’S!

PLEASE REBLOG! HE HAS NOT YET REACHED HIS GOAL!
AS OF OCTOBER 11TH 2014 HE IS $73,207 TOWARD THE $100,000 GOAL! —- IF HE DOESN’T MAKE HIS GOAL HE WILL KEEP WALKING! PLEASE GO TO HIS PAGE AND DONATE!

SAN DIEGO - A Marine who has walked 2,700 miles since May in order to raise money for veterans is nearing the end of his journey.
Justin Kuhel began his March Across America at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. Charities are “The Headstrong Project” and “Help Our Military Heroes” charities.
VIDEO HERE FROM SAN DIEGO: http://www.10news.com/news/marines-walk-across-america-reaches-san-diego

MARCH ACROSS AMERICA: http://www.marchacrossamerica.org/

Contact Info For Justin From His Page: Justin Kuhel, justinkuhel@gmail.com

LIKE HIS FACEBOOK PAGE : https://www.facebook.com/MarchAcrossAmerica

DONATION PAGE: http://www.marchacrossamerica.org/donate/

PHOTOS CREDIT abqjournal.com and March Across America, click through link set

 

Civil War Etiquette: Martine’s Handbook and Vulgarisms in Conversation-  ”Civil War Era Etiquette: Martine’s Handbook and Vulgarisms in Conversation,” originally published in 1866 as a man’s guide to gentlemanly behavior.
Imagine how shocked the author would be to hear the profane greetings, writing and language used today, every sentence from a young girl/guy laced with the “F” bomb. 
How far we’ve come? or have we?
“The true aim of politeness, is to make those with whom you associate as well satisfied with themselves as possible. …it does whatever it can to accommodate their feelings and wishes in social intercourse.”
Today we care little of what those around us think of us. We live in a mentality of “you don’t like what I have to say” “F” you.
MEN NEVER
Curse or discuss “impolite” subjects when ladies are present
Leave a lady you know unattended, except with permission
Use tobacco in any form when ladies are present
Greet a lady in public unless she acknowledges you first (see “Always” #12)
Eat or drink while wearing gloves
Help a lady with her coat, cloak, shawl, etc.
Offer to bring a lady refreshments if they are available
Offer your arm to escort a lady (with whom you are acquainted) into or out of a building or a room at all social events, and whenever walking on uneven ground
Remove your hat when entering a building
Lift your hat to a lady when she greets you in public (Merely touching the brim or a slight “tip” of the hat was very rude)
LADIES NEVER
Grab your hoops or lift your skirts higher than is absolutely necessary to go up stairs
Lift your skirts up onto a chair or stool, etc.
Sit with your legs crossed (except at the ankles if necessary for comfort or habit)
Lift your skirts up onto the seat of your chair when sitting down (Wait for, or if necessary, ask for assistance when sitting down at a table or on a small light chair)
Speak in a loud, coarse voice
http://www.amazon.com/Civil-War-Era-Etiquette-Conversation/dp/0914046071

Civil War Etiquette: Martine’s Handbook and Vulgarisms in Conversation-  ”Civil War Era Etiquette: Martine’s Handbook and Vulgarisms in Conversation,” originally published in 1866 as a man’s guide to gentlemanly behavior.

Imagine how shocked the author would be to hear the profane greetings, writing and language used today, every sentence from a young girl/guy laced with the “F” bomb. 

How far we’ve come? or have we?

“The true aim of politeness, is to make those with whom you associate as well satisfied with themselves as possible. …it does whatever it can to accommodate their feelings and wishes in social intercourse.”

Today we care little of what those around us think of us. We live in a mentality of “you don’t like what I have to say” “F” you.

MEN NEVER

Curse or discuss “impolite” subjects when ladies are present

Leave a lady you know unattended, except with permission

Use tobacco in any form when ladies are present

Greet a lady in public unless she acknowledges you first (see “Always” #12)

Eat or drink while wearing gloves

Help a lady with her coat, cloak, shawl, etc.

Offer to bring a lady refreshments if they are available

Offer your arm to escort a lady (with whom you are acquainted) into or out of a building or a room at all social events, and whenever walking on uneven ground

Remove your hat when entering a building

Lift your hat to a lady when she greets you in public (Merely touching the brim or a slight “tip” of the hat was very rude)


LADIES NEVER

Grab your hoops or lift your skirts higher than is absolutely necessary to go up stairs

Lift your skirts up onto a chair or stool, etc.

Sit with your legs crossed (except at the ankles if necessary for comfort or habit)

Lift your skirts up onto the seat of your chair when sitting down (Wait for, or if necessary, ask for assistance when sitting down at a table or on a small light chair)

Speak in a loud, coarse voice

http://www.amazon.com/Civil-War-Era-Etiquette-Conversation/dp/0914046071

Found This Website Online And Had To Share- Perfect For The Civil War Buff! - Wondering If They Take Requests?

Civil War Portrait Throw Pillows

Info From Site:

Turn relics of America’s history into fashionable living room accessories with these Civil War era portrait pillows. Choose the man who suits your fancy with an option of 3 different portrait pillows.

These throw pillows are certainly an incredible man gift for that hard-to-gift fella in your life!

http://shopnectar.com/product-civil-war-portrait-throw-pillows

1412 Route 213, High Falls, NY 12440
Tel: 845-687-2870 
Email: info@shopnectar.com

 A Family And Its Female Slave House Servants In Brazil, c.1860

Brazil was the last country in the Western world to abolish slavery. By the time it was abolished, in 1888, an estimated four million slaves had been imported from Africa to Brazil, 40% of the total number of slaves brought to the Americas.

American Immigrants to Brazil post Civil War

With the Southern economy in ruins after the Civil war, it is little wonder that many families of  Confederate veterans would succumb to the pleas of Emperor Dom Pedro II of Brazil for immigrants with expertise in farming and cotton planting. By some accounts the number of immigrants from the Confederacy to Brazil in the period from 1865 to 1885 was as high as 9000 people. They came from all over the South, but the largest groups were from Alabama, Texas and South Carolina. Other States represented in this post-Civil War wave of immigration were Louisiana, Mississippi, Georgia and Virginia. The majority of these immigrants settled in the São Paulo State in and around the small town of Vila Santa Bárbara (now known as Santa Bárbara D’Oeste) and founded the town of Americana a few miles away. The climate and soil of this region of Brazil was most like that of their native Southern states, and the pecans and peaches they introduced thrived, as did American varieties of corn and cotton they had brought with them.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_Brazil

Bergad, Laird W. 2007. The Comparative Histories of Slavery in Brazil, Cuba, and the United States. New York: Cambridge University Press.

http://www.essortment.com/post-civil-war-reconstruction-confederate-immigration-brazil-20998.html

THE END OF SLAVERY

While Union victory in the South brought an end to slavery, most plantation estates remained intact and under white ownership after the Civil War. African Americans were now free to leave but many, having no reasonable options, stayed on with their former owners and continued to work for a few more years as tenants or as sharecroppers. However, emancipation brought about a significant transformation for black people and word of their release was received with intense joy.

Eda Harper, a former slave from Mississippi, remembered that when her mother- in-law learned that she was free “she sent and got all the neighbors and they danced all night long.”

Back of the Big House:
The Cultural Landscape of the Plantation

by John Michael Vlach

(Photograph by M.E. Whitehurst, ca. 1890)

Eyewitness To History- The Civil War- THE END OF SLAVERY

I felt like a bird out of a cage. Amen. Amen. Amen. I could hardly ask to feel any better than I did on that day.

— Houston Holloway, former slave from Georgia recalling the moment that slavery ended

Back of the Big House:
The Cultural Landscape of the Plantation

by John Michael Vlach

Washington Along Pennsylvania Ave. Parade To Help Boost The Nation’s Morale - May 23 and 24, 1865, Sherman Later Called The Experience “the happiest and most satisfactory moment of my life.”

President Johnson’s grand review of the Union Army at the end of the Civil War was one of the greatest parades in the Nation’s history. During a 2-day period (May 23-24, 1865), approximately 200,000 troops. led by Gen. George G. Meade on the first day and Gen. William T. Sherman on the second, marched down Pennsylvania Avenue.(Library of Congress, Mathew B. Brady.)

May 23 was a clear, brilliantly sunny day. Starting from Capitol Hill, the Army of the Potomac marched down Pennsylvania Avenue before virtually the entire population of Washington, a throng of thousands cheering and singing favorite Union marching songs. At the reviewing stand in front of the White House were President Johnson, General-in-Chief Ulysses S. Grant, and top government officials. Leading the day’s march, General Meade dismounted in front of the stand and joined the dignitaries to watch the parade. His army made an awesome sight: a force of 80,000 infantrymen marching 12 across with impeccable precision, along with hundreds of pieces of artillery and a seven-mile line of cavalrymen that alone took an hour to pass. One already famous cavalry officer, George Armstrong Custer, gained the most attention that day-either by design or because his horse was spooked when he temporarily lost control of his mount, causing much excitement as he rode by the reviewing stand twice.

Source: The Civil War Society’s “Encyclopedia of the Civil War”

Major General E. O. C. Ord And Staff

Edward Otho Cresap Ord  1818 – 1883 was an American engineer and Army Officer officer who saw action in the Seminole War, the Indian Wars and the Civil War. He commanded an army during the final days of the Civil War, and was instrumental in forcing the surrender of General Robert E. Lee. He also designed Fort Sam Houston. He died in Havana, Cuba of Yellow Fever. 

  • There is a bust of Ord at Grant’s Tomb in New York City depicting him as one of five (Sherman, Thomas, McPherson, Sheridan and Ord) sentinels watching over the tomb of President Ulysses S. Grant.

Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Ord

Officers Of 37th New York Infantry “Irish Rifles”

The 37th New York Infantry Regiment lost 5 officers and 69 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded and 1 officer and 37 enlisted men to disease during the Civil War.

Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Seven Unidentified Soldiers In Union Uniforms Reenacting A Battle Scene, Photographed Between 1861 and 1865

The original ambrotype is owned by the Ohio History Connection. Repository: Reference copy only: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

Skulls and bones of unburied soldiers on south side of Plank Road in 1865. Photographed by a member of the field staff organized by M. B. Brady and possibly by George N. Barnard.

Chancellorsville: Fitzhugh Lee found the entire right side of the Federal lines in the middle of open field, guarded merely by two guns that faced westward, as well as the supplies and rear encampments. The men were eating and playing games in carefree fashion, completely unaware that an entire Confederate corps was less than a mile away. What happened next is given in Fitzhugh Lee’s own words:

So impressed was I with my discovery, that I rode rapidly back to the point on the Plank road where I had left my cavalry, and back down the road Jackson was moving, until I met “Stonewall” himself. “General,” said I, “if you will ride with me, halting your column here, out of sight, I will show you the enemy’s right, and you will perceive the great advantage of attacking down the Old turnpike instead of the Plank road, the enemy’s lines being taken in reverse. Bring only one courier, as you will be in view from the top of the hill.” Jackson assented, and I rapidly conducted him to the point of observation. There had been no change in the picture.

I only knew Jackson slightly. I watched him closely as he gazed upon Howard’s troops. It was then about 2 P.M. His eyes burned with a brilliant glow, lighting up a sad face. His expression was one of intense interest, his face was colored slightly with the paint of approaching battle, and radiant at the success of his flank movement. To the remarks made to him while the unconscious line of blue was pointed out, he did not reply once during the five minutes he was on the hill, and yet his lips were moving. From what I have read and heard of Jackson since that day, I know now what he was doing then. Oh! “beware of rashness,” General Hooker. Stonewall Jackson is praying in full view and in rear of your right flank! While talking to the Great God of Battles, how could he hear what a poor cavalryman was saying. “Tell General Rodes,” said he, suddenly whirling his horse towards the courier, “to move across the Old plank road; halt when he gets to the Old turnpike, and I will join him there.” One more look upon the Federal lines, and then he rode rapidly down the hill, his arms flapping to the motion of his horse, over whose head it seemed, good rider as he was, he would certainly go. I expected to be told I had made a valuable personal reconnaissance—saving the lives of many soldiers, and that Jackson was indebted to me to that amount at least. Perhaps I might have been a little chagrined at Jackson’s silence, and hence commented inwardly and adversely upon his horsemanship. Alas! I had looked upon him for the last time.

— Fitzhugh Lee, address to the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia, 1879

 Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonewall_Jackson

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